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Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology & Hematology

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Iwakuni Bridge

Cherry Blossoms and Iwakuni Bridge

We’re continuing our countdown to the 2016 AACR annual meeting in New Orleans with a look at anti TIM-3 and LAG-3 inhibitory checkpoints and highlighting some of the companies with noteworthy abstracts.

In case you missed it, yesterday AACR announced that Vice President Biden will be delivering remarks on the final day of the meeting, Wednesday, April 20th in the “Highlights 2016: Vision for the Future” Plenary Session. As conference diehards, we will be there in person, but AACR have announced they plan to livestream it to the world. It’s a fitting finale to what is set to be a “must attend” meeting for those with an interest in cancer new product development and in particular, cancer immunotherapy.

What can we learn from AACR abstracts on TIM–3 and LAG–3?

There is some early clinical data that we will be checking out (no pun intended) on TIM-3 and LAG-3.

Subscribers can read Day 2 of our “Road to AACR 2016” coverage by logging in, or you can purchase access below.

Washington DC Cherry Blossoms

Spring cherry blossoms

It’s twelve working days until the start of the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in New Orleans. This is a meeting we’re especially looking forward to this year, not only for the cool science on offer, but also the Louisiana Coastal Cuisine!

Next year, AACR 2017 returns to Washington DC, at what hopefully will be a perfect time for cherry blossoms along the Tidal Basin.

In this post, I’ve taken a closer look at one cancer immunotherapy approach with new data at AACR – bispecific T cell engagers.  Amgen’s blinatumomab (Blincyto) is interesting because it was the first T cell engager antibody to be approved by the FDA for the treatment of Philadelphia-negative ALL and refractory B-cell precursor ALL, thereby offering proof of concept that such an approach could be safe and effective. There are, however, some challenges associated with it (which you’ll read about).

Can we improve on blinatumomab?

This post will address the question in three parts:

  • A look at what we know about blinatumomab to date
  • Where the competitive landscape is evolving with potential solutions
  • An interview with a scientist actively working in this field for their perspective.

For those attending AACR, I’ve put in links to some of the sessions and presentations to watch out for if you have an interest in bispecifics (there are a surprising number of them in R&D) – we’ll be writing more about some of the noteworthy data after it has been presented.

Subscribers can login below or you can purchase access below to Day 1 of our Road to AACR mini series…..

Port Sunglight SpringSpring has arrived in many parts of the world, and with it I am always reminded of William Wordsworth’s classic poem, “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud:”

I wandered lonely as a cloud 
That floats on high o’er vales and hills, 
When all at once I saw a crowd, 
A host, of golden daffodils; 
Beside the lake, beneath the trees, 
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

 

So what does the future hold for cancer immunotherapy?

Inspired by Wordsworth, I’ve sat on my cloud and have looked at some of the recent review papers and thought pieces published by experts in the field. Do they offer a Jerry Maguire – like mission statement: “The Things We Think and Do Not Say: The Future of Our Business” or will we have to wait till AACR 2016 in New Orleans to learn more?

 

This is the latest in our pre-AACR 2016 annual meeting series. Subscribers can login to read more or you can purchase access below.

Lindt Gold BunnyWhat questions are BSB readers sending in to us this month?

I wanted to take a moment out of AACR Previews and catch up on some recent news that is intriguing or perplexing subscribers. All questions are anonymous and in many cases, the same questions were actually sent in by multiple people, a testament to what’s top of mind in oncology lately.

Today, we cover a Q&A on a variety of topics on Kite Pharma (the Genentech collaboration and their TCR in solid tumours), a discussion about EGVRvIII in glioblastoma, and Gilead’s woes with idelalisib and an IO pipeline.

So let’s get started – subscribers can sign-in or you can sign up via the blue box below:

New Orleans Jazz

New Orleans Jazz

Most of the abstracts for the 2016 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (Twitter #AACR16) in New Orleans are now available online, which raises the intriguing question:

What are the top 10 abstracts at AACR 2016? 

If you’re a subscriber, take a moment to think which ones would be on your list, BEFORE you read this post.

Rather than give chapter and verse on a long raft of abstracts, in this second preview post I’ve chosen to focus on a few interesting, intriguing or important issues. Clearly, everyone will have their own way of defining a top 10 list, never mind choosing them! I do hope this starts a debate in your group, it’s always cool discussing science, after all.  Which ones would you choose and why?

What I wanted to do was highlight some of the critical scientific or clinical questions that I have written down in my little black book over the last year or so for which we need solid answers in order to move our understanding of the cancer research along. That list is very long and always seems to be getting longer!  The good news is that we may have answers to some of them at AACR next month. 

Here goes, in no particular order…

Subscribers can login to read more or you can purchase access below:

New Orleans riverfront streetcarThe 2016 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) takes place next month in New Orleans. (Twitter #AACR16).

While many people have focused on the presentation of clinical data at ASCO, we have long argued that emerging scientific data at AACR actually give early hint of what’s to come down the pipeline.

Anticipating these trends and spotting promising new compounds or combinations is probably more art than science, but nonetheless is a very useful and important exercise.

AACR is the most important meeting of the year for cancer new product development! 

Tomorrow, we will be reviewing the actual abstracts, posters, late breakers and what they entail, including important new data such as BMS’s CheckMate–141 exploring nivolumab in Head & Neck cancer as well as the combination of nivolumab plus ipilimumab in CheckMate–069 for advanced melanoma.

In the meantime, what are the main hot topics emerging from this year’s meeting in targeted therapies and immunotherapies?  What do the key scientific sessions tell us about new directions that lie ahead?

To learn more, subscribers can sign-in below or you sign-up in the blue box.

AACR Annual Meeting 2016 BannerOne of the hot topics at the forthcoming 2016 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in New Orleans is likely to be CAR T cell therapy (Twitter: #AACR16).

Several research groups have shown impressive results in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), but challenges remain in using adoptive cell therapy to treat other leukemias such as CLL, as we heard from Dr Porter at the recent BMT Tandem meeting. See post: Challenges and Opportunities of CAR T cell therapy in CLL. Perhaps more significantly, there’s a long way to go before CAR T cell therapies hit prime time in solid tumours.

What is fascinating is the pace of scientific research in the field. By the time the first CAR-T cell therapy is FDA approved, the second generation constructs used in them will most likely be obsolete.

This post reviews completely new research, which we’ve not written about before, that I expect we’ll hear more about at AACR, and discusses novel concepts about how to make CAR T cell therapy more effective in both leukemia and solid tumours.  It’s a good pre-AACR preparation for those interested in cancer immunotherapy and the emerging CAR T cell therapy landscape.

Subscribers can login to read more or you can login to purchase access in the blue box below.

EBCC10

EBCC-10 Cancer Conference

Amsterdam: The 2016 European Breast Cancer Conference organised by the European CanCer Organization (ECCO) is underway (Twitter: #EBCC10 – it’s the 10th official one they have organised).

We thought it would be a good opportunity to take a break from our coverage of #BMTTandem16 to look at some of the posters that are of interest at the meeting.

As regular readers know, we spend a lot of time reading posters – it’s where we pick up new trends and early data. Most go unnoticed or unpublicised in press releases.

For this post, I’ve highlighted four posters that I’m quite interested in and that merit further discussion.

They range from basic and translational research to clinical new product development. By chance, they are evenly split between immunotherapy (PD-L1 and TILs) and acquired drug resistance to different targeted therapies.

Subscribers can login to read more or you can purchase access below.

Koko Crater Botanical Garden

Hawaii, 2016

One of the most common questions we have received from subscribers in the last 6 months relates to Bellicum Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: BLCM) and the opportunity for their adjunct T Cell therapy in development for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), BPX–501. This product is given after the transplant and uses genetically modified donor T cells incorporating a CaspaCIDe safety switch.

We first wrote an in-depth piece about Bellicum and BPX-501 back in January 2015 with an interview with their CEO and CMO for those interested in more background (Link).

At the recent 2016 BMT Tandem meeting in Hawaii, we had the opportunity to hear the latest data on trends in haplo-identical (Haplo) bone marrow transplants. This posts reviews some of the data presented and considers the implication of this on the market opportunity for Bellicum.

Subscribers can log-in to learn more or you can sign up by clicking the blue box below.

One of the most important challenges in cancer immunotherapy is overcoming immune resistance. For example, even with the high response rates seen in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with CAR – T cell therapy, a significant number of patients relapse after an initial response.

Chinatown Honolulu

Chinatown, Honolulu 2016

Could immune resistance be reversed or prevented by the addition of appropriate checkpoint blockade? Which ones matter though, that is the critical question?  Rather than randomly picking ones to try, we need scientific evidence regarding these choices.

This post explores some of the latest data presented at the BMT Tandem meeting on the role of T cell immunoglobulin mucin–3 (TIM–3) and PD–1 upregulation in causing resistance.

If you’re not already a sub and want to read our coverage of ASH, BMT Tandem and the forthcoming AACR 2016 annual meeting, you can purchase individual access below. This week only – inspired by the story of Eddie Aikau in Hawaii – we have a special offer that we’ve never done before (and may never do again) of $75 off a quarterly subscription. The deal ends tomorrow Friday March 4th at 12 noon HST. Check it out!

Subscribers can login to read more about the latest data on how alternative checkpoint inhibitors may have a role to play in cancer treatment.  Welcome to the new folks who signed up this week, good to see y’all!

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