Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology & Hematology

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A couple of years ago we had a lot of fun here on BSB following the progress of ibrutinib (Imbruvica), obinutuzumab (Gazyva), and idelalisib (Zydelig) in CLL and indolent NHL.  It seemed back then that the stunning trio were the hot topics for some time at ASCO and ASH meetings.  Exciting times!  All three target different entities (BTK, anti-CD20 and PI3K-delta) and made it past the tape to market, with Gazyva leading, Imbruvica a close second and Zydelig a slightly more distant third.  I was reminded of the race again over the last week or so as the 4Q earnings were announced, with Pharmacyclics reporting almost $500M for Imbruvica last year and estimating sales to hit $1B in 2015.  In contrast, Zydelig revenues for 2014 were $23M, reflective of their much later market entry in the US.

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ASCO GI 2015 LogoThe metastatic colorectal cancer landscape is slowly changing after decades of multiple chemotherapies followed by the addition of biologics to the base chemo regimen including VEGF (bevacizumab, z-aflibercept, regorafenib) and EGFR inhibitors (cetuximab and panitimumab).

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We have written about small biotechs and big pharma a lot on this blog, particularly when they have exciting new developments in their pipeline to review and consider.  Increasingly, we have also begun to look at the early phase companies because often, that is where some fresh ideas and approaches are being developed and tested.

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Beta thalassemia isn’t something you read much about in the medical lay press, at least until recently.  Part of the problem is the lack of approved therapies, as well as the dearth of new products being evaluated in this condition.  It’s also more common in the Mediterranean, Middle East and Asia compared to the US, where it’s medical cousin, sickle cell anemia, dominates.

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The DNA in a human cell undergoes thousands damaging events per day, generated by both external (exogenous) and internal metabolic (endogenous) processes. Unfortunately, some of these changes can generate errors in the transcription of DNA and subsequent translation into proteins necessary for signaling and cellular function. Genomic mutations can also be carried over into future generations of cells, if the mutation is not repaired prior to mitosis.

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