Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products

Innate immunotherapy – is it ready for prime time in cancer research?

In the past, I’ve sometimes been accused of being a bit of an immunotherapy bear for my dislike of cancer vaccines as a single agent therapy in advanced disease where the tumour burden is very high. That particular field has undoubtedly been a huge graveyard for many companies, much in the same way that metastatic melanoma was, until novel therapeutics and immunotherapeutics emerged to push through the envelope.

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AACR 2014 Preview: Novel targets and approaches

For the third part of the series on the AACR Previews, I wanted to switch directions and take a broad look at five completely different approaches in cancer research that we haven’t discussed on Biotech Strategy before and look at how they are doing and which ones might be promising going forward. Some of these scientific developments could potentially impact existing compounds in development.

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Do ESR1 mutations drive endocrine resistance during the progression of ER+ breast cancer?

Today brings the launch of our series on the AACR annual meeting Previews.  A variety of different topics will be covered over the next two weeks, not just by tumour type and pathway, but also to highlight some novel research that is emerging on various driver mutations that not only can cause resistance to occur, but may also be viable targets for therapeutic intervention.

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Update on overcoming resistance in metastatic melanoma

Every year at AACR meetings there seems to be a new update on how researchers are doing with their work on overcoming resistance in metastatic melanoma. We’ve seen some stunning photos where targeting the BRAF V600E mutation with a specific kinase inhibitor such as vemurafenib (Zelboraf) or dabrafenib (Tafinlar) results in dramatic reduction, and sometimes even complete disappearance of the lesions, only for resistance to set in and the melanoma sadly comes back with a vengeance. Adding a MEK inhibitor such as trametinib (Mekinist) was originally thought to be a rather promising strategy, until it became clear that this only gave a few extra months with exactly the same result.

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