Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts from the ‘Leukemia’ category

It remains exciting times in cancer immunotherapy with breakthrough new cell therapies and checkpoint inhibitors that enhance the effectiveness of T cells.

Cellectis LogoLast Friday, Paris based Cellectis filed their IPO registration statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission (Link to F-1).

They plan to raise $115M through an offering of American Depository Shares. You can read more about their allogeneic Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell approach in the two interviews we did with senior management last year.

Here’s an excerpt of the interview Cellectis CEO André Choulika, PhD gave Biotech Strategy Blog last year – it was the No1 post in 2014: Can Cellectis Revolutionize CAR-T cell Immunotherapy?

As multiple companies seek to move CAR-T cell therapies forward in clinical trials, what will be interesting to see is how this novel treatment fits in with existing therapies such as bone marrow transplants. Will it replace them, or be a bridge to a transplant that enables relapsed or refractory patients to have a second chance?

In addition, where are the potential opportunities beyond B-cell malignancies such as acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) where there’s been dramatic success, particularly in children?

Dr Krishna KomanduriLast week Biotech Strategy Blog had the privilege to interview Dr Krishna Komanduri who is Director of the Adult Stem Cell Transplant Program at the University of Miami Sylvester Cancer Center and holds the Kalish Family Chair in Stem Cell Transplantation.

A physician scientist, he exudes a sense of calm professionalism – I am sure this must reassure many of his patients. Having a bone marrow transplant has been likened to jumping off a cliff in terms of what it does to one’s immune system.

In the last 2-3 years, he has dramatically increased the number of transplants at the University of Miami Sylvester Cancer Center.

Dr Komanduri (@DrKomanduri) was co-chair of the 2015 BMT Tandem meeting that took place earlier this month in San Diego. It’s the combined annual meeting of the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASMBT) and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR).

In a half hour interview he shared his thoughts on what was exciting at Tandem, where the field is going and some of the best abstracts at the meeting which included data on CAR-T cell therapy, GVHD and gene therapy.

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PLA General HospitalThe announcement earlier this week that Cellular Biomedicine Group (NASDAQ: CBMG) has acquired rights to the Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy of the PLA General Hospital in Beijing (pictured right) should come as no surprise to industry watchers. (Link to Press Release).

The share price in $CBMG has risen from $16.31 on February 4 to $23.60 as of close of business on Feb 10, 2015 in what looks like a poorly kept secret!  It looks like most of the rise in share price took place immediately prior to the company’s formal Feb 9, 2015 announcement of the Chinese deal.

CBMG Share Price

 

Those following the cancer immunotherapy space have known for some time that several Chinese groups are working on CAR-T cell therapies that could be a threat if licensed or acquired.

Given the significant investor interest in this space, which is almost bordering on “tulip mania,” it’s entirely foreseeable that companies looking to share in this opportunity would go looking towards China.

One investor on Twitter in response to this news asked should Chinese data be trusted?

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San Francisco – “Manic Monday” is what I call Monday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology. It’s when the majority of oral presentations take place in multiple parallel sessions that require you to run between meeting rooms if you want to follow a particular drug across different blood cancers.

It’s even more challenging this year by the fact the conference is in three buildings at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. While Moscone North and South are interconnected thanks to an underground atrium, to get to sessions in Moscone West from North/South you have to go out of the building, cross one or two main roads, then go up elevators to the second or third floors. Not ideal! I think ASH is now too big for the venue.

Looking back on yesterday, it was a privilege to be in the audience when Dr Kanti Rai received a well-deserved lifetime achievement award for his work in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). A visibily moved Dr Rai was given a standing ovation by the thousands present in the plenary hall.

Dr Kanti Rai ASH14 LIfetime Achievement Award

Expect the #ASH14 Twitter stream today to be like opening the tap to run a bath. I congratulate all the hematology experts who have shared data and commentary from sessions via social media. #ASH14 stands out in terms of expert engagement and a high signal to noise ratio.

If there was an award for best conference coverage of #ASH14 on Twitter I would nominate @drmiguelperales.

Not only does Dr Perales from Sloan-Kettering share tweets from the sessions that he is in that are accurate and informative, but he frequently offers links to relevant papers for those that want to learn more. In addition to showcasing his expertise, this is a really good way to use social media to educate and inform. I look forward to his commentary, particularly if I am in another session at ASH. A must follow on Twitter!

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ENA2014_Banner_400x250The annual Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics jointly run by the EORTC, NCI and AACR (aka “the Triple meeting”), starts tomorrow in Barcelona (Twitter hashtag #ENA2014).

This makes it a particularly busy week on the conference calendar as we segue from immunotherapy at SITC to Molecular Targets, not to mention the start of our previews on hematologic malignancies at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) coming up fast!

The Triple symposium alternates between the US and Europe. In case you missed it, here’s a link to our extensive coverage from last year’s Boston Molecular Targets Symposium that we attended.

This year in Barcelona, one of the highlights is the presentation of the latest clinical data for the phase 1 trial of AG-120 (Agios), an inhibitor of the IDH1 enzyme.

As the abstract that will be presented tomorrow by Daniel Pollyea, MD (University of Colorado, Denver) notes, “Cancer metabolism represents an emerging field of novel cancer target discovery.” Along with epigenetics, it’s an exciting area that we are actively following. For years metabolism has been promising to breakthrough with new ideas that move the needle in clinical research but few have lived up to the lofty expectations, with one exception.

We first wrote Agios back in 2012, when they showed that that mutations of the metabolic gene IDH1 were consistent with that of a cancer causing oncogene in glioblastoma.

Then at ASH 2013, we heard the preclinical data for AG-221 using IDH2 mutant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) xenografts and interviewed the Agios CEO, Dr David Schenkein. The story for AG-221 continued in a positive vein with early clinical data at AACR and ASCO earlier this year. You can read more in the related posts we’ve highlighted at  the end of this article.

Tomorrow at EORTC-NCI-AACR Molecular Targets in Barcelona we will hear about the preliminary results for the phase 1 trial of AG-120 in patients with advanced hematological malignancies including those with relapsed or refractory AML, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and elderly untreated AML that harbor an IDH1 mutation.

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Sometimes you get lucky before a conference and catch an interview with a thought leader ahead of time when it’s more relaxed and less fraught with all the demands of meetings etc while there.

rick young

Dr R Young, Source: WI

That good fortune happened to me on the Friday before the recent AACR conference in San Diego, when I recorded an interview with Dr Richard Young, (Whitehead Institute & MIT and scientific co-founder of Syros), who was giving a plenary talk on the Sunday at AACR entitled, “Transcriptional and Epigenetic Control of Tumor Cells.”

Epigenetics and transcriptional changes are fascinating concepts to me because they get right to the heart of what’s going on deep in the oncogenes and how they control processes in cancer. Clearly, in simplistic terms, if we can understand how things change and evolve, then we can potentially devise better strategies to overcome them. Instead of targeting a protein kinase with a small molecule or a cell surface antigen with a monocloncal antibody, this is an altogether different approach. Protein-protein interactions such as MYC, RUNX1, p53/TP53 etc have long been the bugbear and frustration of many good researchers, precisely because they are challenging to target with conventional approaches.

So what’s new and why am I really excited about these new developments?

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