Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Agenus’

After looking at one important poster yesterday on multiple myeloma, it’s time to explore other equally interesting targets in other tumour types.

Some years reflect the inertia that hit oncology R&D with a lot of old data rehashed or they can be flooded with many me-too compounds.  Not this year, there’s a lot to talk about and review… so much so that we may well have enough for three rounds of Gems from the Poster Halls, time permitting as ASCO is fast approaching!

Without much further ado, for round 1 we have explored eight posters spanning four companies with a variety of different targets including chemotherapy, targeted therapies and immunotherapies.  I will say though, that the lines are being blurred as all of these modalities can impact the immune system, sometimes in unexpected ways.

What’s in store for today?  A focus on biotech companies doing intriguing cancer research.

Companies mentioned: Infinity, Innate, Incyte, Agenus

British Javelin TrainIt’s Day 6 of our Countdown to the AACR 2016 annual meeting in New Orleans. We’re at the halfway, 6 posts written and 6 more to go!  Then it will be daily Live blogs from the meeting.

There’s a lot of cancer immunotherapy at AACR this year, so after yesterday’s post on GITR we’re continuing our mini-series with a look at another immune agonist.

Today, we’re moving onto OX40 (CD134) as a novel immuno-target. Regular readers will know that we’ve been following this target for some time.

Immune agonists such as GITR, OX40, CD40, CD27 and 4-1BB help to rev up T cells. As Dr Tom Gajewski (Chicago) told us last year, in an interview published on the blog and excerpted in Episode 6 of the Novel Targets Podcast: Stepping on the Gas:

…there are inhibitory receptors on activated T cells that are involved with shutting immune responses down. There are also activating receptors that help to rev up those T cells. You might question whether you can push an activator and block an inhibitor, and maybe get a good anti-tumor response going as well.

When we drive a car, we both lift our foot off the break and we step on the accelerator. We have really beautiful data in animals that that this is exactly the case, that if you hit one of those strong positive regulators, and block just one of the negative regulators, you can have complete disappearance of the tumors in mice.

Several of those positive agonistic antibodies against costimulatory receptors are in the clinic. One of them is anti-OX40 that a couple of groups have in the clinic. We’re working with Genentech, that has one of those agents in phase I.

What does the OX40 competitive landscape look like?

In those post we’ve provided commentary on some of the new products in development from companies and highlighted a surprising number of abstracts that you’ll want to watch out for at AACR 2016 if you’re on the cancer immunotherapy track.

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Macarons in shop windowWe’re all familiar by now with the idea of checkpoints that can be inhibitory (release the brake) or stimulatory (put the foot on the gas) on the immune system.

There are multiple checkpoint modulators in development, it’s becoming a bit like buying a macaron – which flavour do you want?

As the late Holbrook Kohrt said on the Novel Targets Podcast last year:

There are two types of checkpoint inhibitors, one checkpoint inhibitor are these series of markers that each of them when you target them, they will slow down the function of that cell. Now that’s a good thing if that cell is a suppressor cell, such as a regulatory T cell. Anti-CTLA-4, ipilimumab, the first approved immunotherapeutic monoclonal antibody targets these regulatory T cells. Essentially is this concept as you said of taking off the brake .

Now if you want to press on the gas pedal, you want to find a target that is essentially that actually increases the function of a cell you want to make work better…….

…. these ideas of the different checkpoint inhibitors, essentially we should really call them, checkpoint modulation, because the checkpoints can either be gas pedals or they can be brakes.

And ultimately, it’s a question about how do you combine them in a rational way so that way you’re not either pushing the car too hard or taking the brake off at a time when the car is rolling in the wrong direction.

So essentially, you need to do checkpoint modulation in a setting where you still have the steering wheel on your car to ensure it’s directed against the right cells, otherwise you’re going to get significant toxicity.”

Which is a good introduction to Day 5 of our Road to AACR 2016 mini-series.

Over the course of 12 days in the run up to the 2016 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), we’re taking a look at some of the areas we expect to hear more about in New Orleans.

In today’s post, which continues our look at some of novel cancer immunotherapy targets, we’re look at the modulation of GITR (glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor related gene) and companies that are targeting this.

GITR was named as the 12th most promising cancer immunotherapy target by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) back in 2006.  Interestingly, high GITR expression can be found on both T cells and NK cells.

There are now several agonist antibodies in development and entering the clinic that seek to activate GITR, and new data is expected at AACR 2016.

What GITR pathway data is worth looking out for at AACR 2016?

If you want to know more about why GITR matters, and where it fits into the cancer immunotherapy landscape then do read more. 

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One of the most important challenges in cancer immunotherapy is overcoming immune resistance. For example, even with the high response rates seen in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with CAR – T cell therapy, a significant number of patients relapse after an initial response.

Chinatown Honolulu

Chinatown, Honolulu 2016

Could immune resistance be reversed or prevented by the addition of appropriate checkpoint blockade? Which ones matter though, that is the critical question?  Rather than randomly picking ones to try, we need scientific evidence regarding these choices.

This post explores some of the latest data presented at the BMT Tandem meeting on the role of T cell immunoglobulin mucin–3 (TIM–3) and PD–1 upregulation in causing resistance.

If you’re not already a sub and want to read our coverage of ASH, BMT Tandem and the forthcoming AACR 2016 annual meeting, you can purchase individual access below. This week only – inspired by the story of Eddie Aikau in Hawaii – we have a special offer that we’ve never done before (and may never do again) of $75 off a quarterly subscription. The deal ends tomorrow Friday March 4th at 12 noon HST. Check it out!

Subscribers can login to read more about the latest data on how alternative checkpoint inhibitors may have a role to play in cancer treatment.  Welcome to the new folks who signed up this week, good to see y’all!

Dr Mario Sznol

Dr Mario Sznol at SITC 2015 Patient Forum

Novel Immunotherapies and Combinations” was the title of the talk by Dr Mario Sznol (Yale) at the recent Immunotherapy Patient Forum co-hosted by Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Organization (GRACE) and the Melanoma Research Alliance at the 2015 SITC annual meeting.

At the forum, Dr Sznol also led a breakout session, where he reviewed what is melanoma, the treatment of primary melanoma and management of advanced disease, as well as answering questions from the patients and patient advocates.

Often at medical meetings you hear the results of a clinical trial that is but one piece of the jigsaw, so it was interesting to hear a more comprehensive overview of the disease.

Dr Sznol kindly spoke with BSB about his vision for the future of cancer immunotherapies. This post includes excerpts from the interview along with additional commentary.

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There has been a lot of enthusiasm in the immuno-oncology space since ASCO about the possibility of combining a checkpoint inhibitor with an immune stimulator.  There are several ideas behind this approach since:

a) Not all patients respond to checkpoint inhibitors
b) Some patients only partially respond, although they can achieve an attenuated response before relapsing

An important question in many people’s mind is what is different about these subsets of patients compared to exceptional responders? How can we change that situation for the better?

Two approaches that have been mooted of late include the following:

  • Using a cancer vaccine to ‘prime’ the tumour
  • Combining a checkpoint inhibitor with an antibody agonist to stimulate the immune system

CrowdAt SITC in Maryland this weekend, there were plenty of packed presentations and discussions on both of these classes of agents, so this is a good time to explore the idea of immune stimulators further based on the latest data we heard.

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“Nothing lasts forever, because nothing ever has.”

James Shelley, The Caesura Letters

This year’s annual AACR meeting was so good, we could probably write another 50 posts and still not be done! With ASCO fast approaching, however, it’s almost time to draw it to a close and the final post conference note will be published on Monday.

Today is the penultimate report and focuses on the key highlights that caught my attention in immuno-oncology, which covers the gamut from checkpoint inhibitors, co-stimulants, innate immunotherapy and CAR T cell therapy to bispecific antibody TCRs.

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