Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘ASCO 2014 Blog’

Chicago – it’s the last day of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting. There’s been a record attendance this year with over 30,000 people coming to Chicago to hear the latest news and research on cancer treatments.

The message I am left with is the considerable hope it offers cancer patients around the well as researchers harness the latest techniques in genome sequencing and through a deeper understanding of cancer biology, develop new targets and ways of attacking this disease. Attacking the immune system (immuno-oncology) is one of the most exciting areas in cancer drug development.

I only wish other areas of biomedical research where there is an unmet need e.g. new and effective treatments for neuro-degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, offered such hope and focused research activity.

It’s the final day of ASCO 2014 and only the diehards are left (or those who couldn’t get a plane out early).  We hope you’ve enjoyed the “live” blog and our notes from the road each day.

What are we covering this morning? Subscribers can login below or sign up to find out more.

Chicago – it’s day 4 of the ASCO (American Society of Clinical Oncology) annual meeting. Sunday at ASCO can be a bit hit or miss depending on whether the plenary selection committee makes a good choice in which studies to give the “glory” and how interesting they are. It’s certainly been a busy meeting, although I have to say going round the poster halls has been a horrible experience.

For the first time this year, they doubled up the trials in progress posters, which makes it like a rugby scrum to reach the QR code to get a copy, and all it means is that people use smaller text to cram the same material into a smaller area. People do want to talk people about what’s going on, the rational for trials and it must be a miserable experience for presenters to be faced with such cramped conditions. Memo to ASCO – it was not a good idea and the new poster numbering layout is really hard to follow. It’s not as if there is a shortage of space.

Yesterday afternoon was an afternoon of plenary data. It was interesting to see leading breast cancer physician and influential ASCO member Robert Miller (@RSM2800) question the choice on Twitter:

While I completely agree with the need to publish negative data so that researchers in the field can better understand what happened and learn how to design trials better or differently, that is after all what science is about, I do question whether EVERYONE at ASCO needs to know that. An oral presentation of the ALTTO trial data in a breast cancer session would have been sufficient to achieve that goal. I personally thought the PREVAIL trial data from enzalatumide in advanced prostate cancer prior to chemotherapy was more worthy of plenary recognition than a negative data breast cancer trial. The PREVAIL data was published in the New England Journal of Medicine yesterday.

There were other data worthy of plenary recognition and we’ll be writing them up on the blog. So what’s on the agenda for today?  Subscribers can login below to read more.

The ASCO 2014 conference here in Chicago is in full swing as it enters day 3. We’re continuing our coverage of the meeting with our daily live blog where we post regular updates of data that catches our interest or quick notes from sessions we’ve been to.

What have been the highlights so far – well the AZD9291 vs. CO-1686 debate is keeping the analysts busy. I interviewed Dr Pasi Jänne yesterday about the AZD9291 data and will be talking with Dr Lecia Sequist later today to talk about CO-1686. Meetings such as ASCO do afford the opportunity to talk to thought leaders.

What’s on the agenda this morning? Subscribers can login to read where we’ll be at and what we will be covering.

Good morning from Chicago and the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) where we are continuing our coverage of the meeting with a live blog from day 2 of the meeting.

As the day progresses we’ll be adding in tweets we want to share, short comments on sessions we attend (blog posts will follow later), and time-permitting excerpts of interviews. It’s an experiment, so bear with us, we hope it works and doesn’t distract too much from time spent gathering data and talking to people.

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