Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘ASCO 2014 Posters’

Readers of the blog and those who’ve seen us at conferences will know that we spend a lot of time in the poster halls at meetings such as AACR, ASCO, ASH, ESMO/ECCO.

Anybody can write about data in a press briefing, or a plenary session, but if you want to have insights into the future, and identify early opportunities, you have to look at posters.

This year at ASCO 2014, others seemed to have the same strategy as the poster halls were frequently overcrowded and for a popular poster it was like a rugby scrum just to reach the poster and scan a QR code.  As for ASCO’s flawed thinking in putting two posters on one board….. the least said about that the better.

What’s interesting in the poster sessions is that there is a wisdom of crowds feel to some of the posters – if there’s a crowd of people, more will gather. It’s like a traffic accident, you can’t possibly read the poster from afar, but it must be important if everyone’s gathered round…

Feels like you're walking to Ohio

Feels like walking to Ohio to reach South 405

Anyone doing the poster circuit at ASCO, puts in the miles between the general sessions on the side of the main exhibit hall, goes over the #BlisterWalk bridge to reach E354b in the East building and then marches up and down the “road to Ohio” to reach South 405 where the Developmental Therapeutics sessions are presented. Rinse and repeat multiple times a day, you’ll soon be scowling at your ‘comfy’ shoes 😉

That said, it was worth the effort and this post offers a personal selection of some of the many posters that caught our attention.

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Chicago – it’s day 4 of the ASCO (American Society of Clinical Oncology) annual meeting. Sunday at ASCO can be a bit hit or miss depending on whether the plenary selection committee makes a good choice in which studies to give the “glory” and how interesting they are. It’s certainly been a busy meeting, although I have to say going round the poster halls has been a horrible experience.

For the first time this year, they doubled up the trials in progress posters, which makes it like a rugby scrum to reach the QR code to get a copy, and all it means is that people use smaller text to cram the same material into a smaller area. People do want to talk people about what’s going on, the rational for trials and it must be a miserable experience for presenters to be faced with such cramped conditions. Memo to ASCO – it was not a good idea and the new poster numbering layout is really hard to follow. It’s not as if there is a shortage of space.

Yesterday afternoon was an afternoon of plenary data. It was interesting to see leading breast cancer physician and influential ASCO member Robert Miller (@RSM2800) question the choice on Twitter:

While I completely agree with the need to publish negative data so that researchers in the field can better understand what happened and learn how to design trials better or differently, that is after all what science is about, I do question whether EVERYONE at ASCO needs to know that. An oral presentation of the ALTTO trial data in a breast cancer session would have been sufficient to achieve that goal. I personally thought the PREVAIL trial data from enzalatumide in advanced prostate cancer prior to chemotherapy was more worthy of plenary recognition than a negative data breast cancer trial. The PREVAIL data was published in the New England Journal of Medicine yesterday.

There were other data worthy of plenary recognition and we’ll be writing them up on the blog. So what’s on the agenda for today?  Subscribers can login below to read more.

The ASCO 2014 conference here in Chicago is in full swing as it enters day 3. We’re continuing our coverage of the meeting with our daily live blog where we post regular updates of data that catches our interest or quick notes from sessions we’ve been to.

What have been the highlights so far – well the AZD9291 vs. CO-1686 debate is keeping the analysts busy. I interviewed Dr Pasi Jänne yesterday about the AZD9291 data and will be talking with Dr Lecia Sequist later today to talk about CO-1686. Meetings such as ASCO do afford the opportunity to talk to thought leaders.

What’s on the agenda this morning? Subscribers can login to read where we’ll be at and what we will be covering.

Welcome to ASCO 2014 (#ASCO14), and this year’s annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the world’s largest cancer conference.

It’s the Super Bowl of cancer conferences – the meeting you not only have to be at if you’re in the field, but where you want to have your data presented. The press room is truly multinational.

The weather I have to say is glorious in Chicago, it’s probably the best time of year to visit, but as anyone who has ever been to ASCO knows, it’s an all consuming meeting and you never have any chance to visit the sights, although the travel department has kindly provided a room with a view.

This year we’ll be writing daily blog posts that provide rolling coverage – as and when the opportunity presents – we’ll be updating the post with news, commentary, and the occasional picture or clip from an interview.

Today, despite being primarily a travel day, we made it to a couple of the poster highlights sessions.

Sadly, with flights, hotels and bar bills to pay, the ASCO coverage is for subscribers only. The first of our live blogs begins below. It will probably kill us to do this, but here goes…..we’re kicking off with some commentary on the poster highlights sessions.

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