Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Biothera’

Over the last year or two, we have covered a number of different pathways that are involved with the immune system including CD19 and 20, CTLA–4, PD–1 and PD-L1, IDO1, CD40, OX40, TIGIT, ICOS and others.

Today, it’s the turn of an oncoprotein called NY-ESO–1 that has been garnering quite a bit of attention of late and will also be highly relevant to some upcoming posts and thought leader interviews we have scheduled here on Biotech Strategy Blog. It’s always a good idea to cover the basics first, before exploring the more advanced concepts.

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Immuno-oncology is one of the hottest topics, if not, the hottest in cancer drug development at the moment, and every conference seems to advance the field forward. The pace of progress is breathtaking as thought leaders and pharma & biotech seek to maximize how to leverage the body’s immune system in the fight against cancer. It’s exciting times!

Coming up next on the calendar are two cancer conferences, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) held in Maryland later this week, followed swiftly by the EORTC-AACR-NCI Molecular Targets conference (often referred to as the Triple meeting by industry insiders) in Barcelona just before Thanksgiving.

SITC 2014 Immunotherapy Banner

Whoa, that’s a lot of data yet to come, and then in December we have the American Society of Hematology (ASH) and San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).

Back home in the Blighty, November is often referred to as the ‘month of the drowned dog’ because it rains a lot… at this rate it’s more like raining data – let’s hope not too many agents are headed for dog drug heaven! The good news for subscribers is there’s a lot of conference coverage to come!

2014 ESMO Congress Poster HallSo here we are, after nearly two dozen posts, it’s time to close out the 2014 ESMO coverage with a final review of the immuno-oncology posters that piqued our interest.

There were 16 in all that fitted that category. Normally, we highlight three or four gems from the poster halls, so more than a baker’s dozen is quite a feast.

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“Nothing lasts forever, because nothing ever has.”

James Shelley, The Caesura Letters

This year’s annual AACR meeting was so good, we could probably write another 50 posts and still not be done! With ASCO fast approaching, however, it’s almost time to draw it to a close and the final post conference note will be published on Monday.

Today is the penultimate report and focuses on the key highlights that caught my attention in immuno-oncology, which covers the gamut from checkpoint inhibitors, co-stimulants, innate immunotherapy and CAR T cell therapy to bispecific antibody TCRs.

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In the past, I’ve sometimes been accused of being a bit of an immunotherapy bear for my dislike of cancer vaccines as a single agent therapy in advanced disease where the tumour burden is very high. That particular field has undoubtedly been a huge graveyard for many companies, much in the same way that metastatic melanoma was, until novel therapeutics and immunotherapeutics emerged to push through the envelope.

To be clear, I am though, a big fan of targeted immunotherapies such as checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which have been very much to the forefront in immuno-oncology over the last two years and rightly so, with some initial trials showing some very promising results.

Both of those approaches are squarely part of the adaptive immune system and seek, in different ways, to retrain the bodies immune system to fight the tumour. More recently, the innate immune system has seen new advances as reearchers moved beyond simple vaccines to develop more thoughtful and innovative approaches that seek to outwit the very masking the cancer is trying to fool the immune system with. It’s no less exciting, just a different way of looking at the science and improving out understanding of the biology of the many diseases that cancer makes up.

In this AACR preview, I take a broad look at some innovative and novel scientific approaches, including targeting anti-CD47 and SIRPα (Stanford and Stem Cell Therapeutics), KIR and MICA (Innate Pharma) and neutrophils (Biothera).

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This week the Cancer Conference Coverage moves to the joint IASLC-AACR symposium on the Molecular Origins of Lung Cancer in San Diego.  Having attended previous events (this is the third one they’ve hosted) and rather enjoyed them, this year I’m following it remotely.

What’s particularly nice about this type of specialist event is that they are especially useful for chatting informally with attendees and being able to ask a lot of questions that simply wouldn’t be feasible at larger meetings due to time and other constraints.

This review covers my thoughts on two immunotherapies, namely Merck’s anti-PD-1, which was previously presented at the World Lung Conference, plus a completely novel and very different approach that looks really quite exciting.

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