Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘brachyury’

We have selected five key strategic trends that are emerging that will be critical to follow, understand, and even implement if you are on the coal-face of clinical research and new product development.

ASCO16 Chicago 5We aren’t talking about financial things such as cost toxicity, or even how doctors should be paid, but meaty scientific aspects that we need to watch out for. If we are going to improve on cancer research and R&D in the future, these issues will be important.

For companies and academic researchers alike, there is much to learn from the tsunami of data that hit this week if you have a keen interest in the field and a bent for making sense of patterns out of an amorphous mass of data.

Not paying attention to evolution in clinical development can mean the difference between being in the winners circle, on the outside looking in, or falling way behind your competitors. Playing catch up is never anyone’s idea of fun in this market – oncology moves at a lightning fast pace compared to many other therapy areas.

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Dr Chris Heery NCIDr Chris Heery (@ChrisHeery) is a medical oncologist at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) who works in the Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology (LTIB) with Jeffrey Schlom, James Gulley and other translational scientists.

The aim of the LTIB is to develop novel immunotherapies for cancer. One of the ways this is accomplished is through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), in essence a joint venture with the private sector.

At the recent Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) annual meeting, Dr Heery presented a poster on the results of a phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate the safety and tolerability of a therapeutic vaccine, MVA-BN Brachyury, targeting brachyury. See Bavarian Nordic Press Release Nov 3, 2015.

We previously heard at ASCO 2015 about the rational for targeting brachyury from Dr James Gulley (see post: Future of Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy).

It was a pleasure to talk with Dr Heery about his poster and what the potential of therapeutic cancer vaccines may be in the cancer immunotherapy arsenal.

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With the launch of Episode 4 of the Novel Targets podcast today, I wanted to provide some more detailed background and a roadmap for this part of the journey for subscribers. There’s tremendous wealth of data now building up in several areas related to cancer immunotherapy and both interviewees, Drs Oliver Sartor (Tulane) and James Gulley (NCI), touched on many of them.

Thanks to Tom Gajewski’s exciting work, we can broadly think about different tumour types as inflamed (immunogenic) versus non-inflamed (non-immunogenic), which is a helpful starting point. Not all tumours thought to be responsive to immunotherapy will actually respond though, so we still have much work to do on the 70–80% of patients with solid tumours that don’t respond to these therapies.

Anyone who is interested can listen to the latest Novel Targets podcast.

The latest episode explores non-immunogenic tumours, using prostate cancer as an example. In the last third of the show, we do indeed talk about a promising new target that may have relevance not just to prostate cancer, but other tumour types too.

Listen to Episode 4  (open access thanks to our sponsors, Genentech)

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