Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Cancer Immunotherapy Strategy’

Dr Michel Sadelain AACR 2016

Dr Michel Sadelain at AACR 2016

Dr Michel Sadelain, Director of Cell Engineering at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York is a pioneer in the field of adoptive cell therapy.

Without his contribution, it is unlikely CAR T cell therapy would be where it is today.

He’s also President of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy (ASGCT), whose annual meeting is currently underway in Washington DC from May 4 to 7 (Twitter #ASGCT16).

Recently at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), Dr Sadelain gave an outstanding presentation on turbo-charged CAR T cells, and shared some of his ideas on how to move the field forward.

In New Orleans, he also kindly spoke to BSB, and discussed how he thinks cell therapy researchers may obtain the “holy grail” of getting CAR T cell therapies to work effectively in solid tumors.

Dr Sadelin is someone who wants to break the immunology rules!

Not surprisingly, Dr Sadelain is optimistic and doesn’t share the view expressed by Dr Steven Rosenberg on CAR T cell therapies being limited to mostly hematologic malignancies when we interviewed him a year ago at last year’s ASGCT meeting.  There’s nothing like a friendly controversy to spice the field up!

If you haven’t already done so, do listen to Dr Rosenberg on Episode 5 of the Novel Targets Podcast (@TargetsPodcast).

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King Kamehameha Statue Honolulu HI

King Kamehameha Statue, Honolulu HI

Honolulu: we’re continuing our coverage of the 2016 BMT Tandem meeting with a thought leader interview about a novel cancer immunotherapy approach that we’re excited about.

The cancer cell therapy landscape is still vastly uncharted territory in many respects.

The first CD19 targeted CAR T cell therapies expected to reach the market in 2017 are unlikely to be best-in-class, which leaves the commercial door open for other approaches that may be better, cheaper or more accessible.

If you are in the CAR T cell therapy space, there are plenty of competitive threats on the horizon, and the novel approach discussed in this post is one of them!

We’d heard a little about it, but hadn’t explored the concept in any detail, so were delighted to talk with a leading expert at the BMT Tandem meeting in Honolulu.

Subscribers can login or you can purchase access to read more about a cell therapy that could offer the benefits of a CAR without the need for genetic modification.

Dr Chris Heery NCIDr Chris Heery (@ChrisHeery) is a medical oncologist at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) who works in the Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology (LTIB) with Jeffrey Schlom, James Gulley and other translational scientists.

The aim of the LTIB is to develop novel immunotherapies for cancer. One of the ways this is accomplished is through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), in essence a joint venture with the private sector.

At the recent Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) annual meeting, Dr Heery presented a poster on the results of a phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate the safety and tolerability of a therapeutic vaccine, MVA-BN Brachyury, targeting brachyury. See Bavarian Nordic Press Release Nov 3, 2015.

We previously heard at ASCO 2015 about the rational for targeting brachyury from Dr James Gulley (see post: Future of Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy).

It was a pleasure to talk with Dr Heery about his poster and what the potential of therapeutic cancer vaccines may be in the cancer immunotherapy arsenal.

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Readers may recall at the 2014 annual meeting of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) we wrote about the work of Dr Marcel van den Brink (MSKCC) on how the composition of bacteria in the gut can have an impact on graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), and survival post bone marrow transplant. See post: Can you reduce Graft versus Host Disease GvHD by regulating gut bacteria?

At SITC 2015, we heard from Dr Tom Gajewski (University of Chicago) who presented work from his laboratory, recently published in Science, that shows the gut microbiota can also impact the efficacy of checkpoint inhibitors.

Tom Gajewski SITC 2015

Dr Gajweski is one of the foremost cancer immunotherapy researchers in the United States. He previously spoke with BSB about his work on the STING pathway, and how the tumor microenvironment impacts checkpoint inhibitor efficacy. See post: Tom Gajewski takes the STING out of Cancer.

In his extremely busy schedule at SITC, Dr Gajewski found a few minutes to talk about his latest research and future plans.

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Some people may think that if you just give a whole boat load of engineered T cells, and in particular, those modified with a Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR), that responders are “cured.”

While some recipients of engineered T cells can have long-term, durable remissions, others may initially respond, only to subsequently relapse.

Resistance to CAR T cell therapy can and does occur.

In this post, we talked with a leading expert about the latest research on how resistance to cell therapy develops, and the potential strategies to overcome it.

CAR T cell therapy is exciting, but remains an emerging field with multiple ways in which the competitive landscape may be shaped moving forwards.

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Oxford based Immunocore is an emerging UK biotechnology company that should be on your radar if you’re following companies such as Kite Pharmaceuticals and Juno Therapeutics. If it isn’t already you can expect to hear a lot more about them in the forthcoming year as they start clinical trials with the many leading global pharma companies who have already partnered with them.

Dr Namir Hassan, Immunocore

Immunocore is an immuno-oncology company with an innovative approach to targeting T Cell Receptors (TCR) using their proprietary ImmTAC (Immune mobilising monoclonal TCRs against cancer) technology platform.

Namir Hassan, D.Phil (pictured right) is Director of Translational Research and Head of Development at Immunocore. BSB met with him and Chief Business Officer, Eva-Lotta Allan at the company offices located in a science and business park near Oxford.

Immunocore recently raised $320M in Europe’s largest private life sciences funding. (Link to Press Release)

Earlier this year preliminary clinical data for IMCgp100 their first-in-class novel immunotherapy was presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in Philadelphia by Mark Middleton, Professor of Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University of Oxford.

In the interview, excerpts of which you can read below, Dr Hassan explained why their exciting and innovative approach that targets the T Cell Receptor is different from other companies in the field, what they have learned from the preliminary clinical data, and the potential immTACs may offer in combination with other cancer immunotherapies.

If you’re not a cancer immunologist, this type of science is complex, so the aim of the interview was to put into context the data already in the public domain and gain some insights into the excitement behind ImmTACs and what immunocore are doing. If you don’t understand the potential of TCRs and ImmTACs as immunotherapies, this post is for you!

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One of the interesting questions raised by the recently announced and much-discussed Juno/Celgene collaboration is whether you really need a Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell therapy in your portfolio to succeed as a global cancer immunotherapy company?

One leading cancer immunotherapy company that believes you don’t is Roche.  At ASCO 2015 I had the privilege to talk about this with a leading cancer scientist, William Pao, MD PhD (pictured below). Dr Pao formerly worked with Nobel Prize-winning scientist Harold Varmus at Memorial Sloan Kettering, and subsequently led the Hematology-Oncology Division at Vanderbilt. He joined Roche in July 2014 to lead their early development of innovative oncology new products (see press release).

Dr William Pao Roche

I particularly enjoyed Dr Pao’s discussion of the T-cell centric strategic framework around which the Roche/Genentech cancer immunotherapy portfolio strategy is based.

If you haven’t done so already, do listen to Episode 3 of the Novel Targets podcast (ASCO Lung Cancer Show) in which you can hear an excerpt from my interview with Dr Pao.

This is the first in a series of interviews with scientific leaders at companies at the forefront of cancer research.

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Photo: National Institutes of Health

After last week’s post on therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), we received a bunch of questions from readers.

I don’t have time to answer them all in detail individually (sorry!), but it does provide an opportunity to review the evolving landscape and address some of them within the latest article.

It seems to be a good time to take a broader look at T cell manipulation, especially as it pertains to the application of TILs, chimeric antigen receptors (CAR), and T cell receptors (TCR).

We’ve certainly come along way since the historic lecture in 1991 pictured right (photo: National Institutes of Health), but there’s still some way to go before the full potential of cancer immunotherapy is reached.

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It’s a funny old world sometimes… I was planning to post a mini series on immuno-oncology presentations from ESMO this week and review what we had learned from the new data, good and not so good. This morning’s sudden announcement from Genentech regarding their latest collaboration is therefore rather timely:

“An exclusive worldwide licensing agreement and research collaboration with NewLink Genetics for the discovery and development of IDO (indoleamine-(2,3)-dioxygenase) pathway inhibitors for the potential treatment of cancer.”

There are a number of reasons why they might do this that make a lot of solid scientific sense. To learn more about our insights, subscribers can sign in or you can sign up in the box below.

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