Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Dr Bernard Fox’

Cancer Immunotherapy will require personalized treatment based on the type of cancer you have, and the immune response your body has generated to the cancer.

Dr Holbrook Kohrt Stanford

Dr Holbrook Kohrt at Immunology 2015

The sadly missed and visionary Dr Holbrook Kohrt was very prescient when he told BSB in New Orleans back in May 2015:

“Today when I see a patient or you go to a cancer center, the first thing they ask is what type of cancer do you have? Most patients respond – breast cancer, a colon cancer – unfortunately we are not in position where patients can say I have a deficiency in my cytotoxic CD8 cells or I have overly active regulatory T cells.

I actually envision a day when patients will know both sites, they will know they have breast cancer and they’ll also know it’s because there’s a lack of effector cytotoxic CD8 T cells. That combination knowledge, of what your immune system is lacking and what tumor you have, that combination will allow you to identify what type of immunotherapy you need.

Patients may need CAR directed T cells and those will be for patients who have completely non-functional T cells themselves, no matter what therapy you give them, you’re not going to create those cells within the body, therefore you need to do it ex-vivo in a petri dish and give it back to them.

Other patients may have T cells that just need to be turned on and so all they need is a checkpoint modulator and that combination is going to be effective enough for them.

So it’s this dual diagnosis, diagnosing their immune system and diagnosing their tumor that’s going to allow us to identify one, two, or three therapies that’s going to be the right cocktail.” 

See post: Holbrook Kohrt leads the way in Targeting CD137, you can also listen to excerpts on the Novel Targets Podcast: Episode 6: Stepping on the Gas

ICYMI do listen to the tribute to Dr Kohrt on the Novel Targets Podcast from two people who knew him at Stanford: Dr Ron Levy and Dr Dan Chen (@DanChenMDPhD). It’s at the start of Episode 11: Cancer Immunity Cycle.

Immunoscore® — a diagnostic test based on the immune profile of a patient is based on the pioneering work of INSERM scientist Dr Jérôme Galon.

Dr Jerome Galon at ASCO 2016

Dr Jérôme Galon at ASCO 2016

We are fans of his work, and interviewed him at the 2015 European Cancer Congress. See post: Immunosurveillance, Immunoscore & Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy – an interview with Jérôme Galon.

Over 10 years ago, Dr Galon’s research published in The New England Journal of Medicine and Science showed that the type, location and density of immune cells within a tumor predicts clinical outcome in early stage colon cancer.

These findings led to the development of an assay called Immunoscore® that’s based on an analysis of cytotoxic T cells, the ones that kill cancer.

In the process, it has led to a new way of classifying stage 2/3 colon cancer patients: those with a high Immunoscore® (good prognosis), and those with a low Immunoscore® (poor prognosis). Dr Galon’s work has shown that irrespective of whether you are MSI high or MSS, colon cancer prognosis correlates with Immunoscore.

Dr Bernard Fox at #AACR16

Dr Bernard Fox at AACR 2016

As we heard from Dr Bernie Fox (@BernardAFox) at AACR 2016. See post: AACR Cancer Immunotherapy Insights from Dr Bernard Fox, listen to excerpts on Novel Targets Podcast Episode 12: Of Mice and Men:

“What I teach the first year medical students is that if you have metastatic cancer, the only thing that makes a difference in your life is whether you’ve got your immune system turned on. If it’s not turned on, it doesn’t make a difference what you get, chemo, radiation, surgery, you aren’t going to do well.”

Immune response is key to outcome, which means that knowing what your immune profile is will be key to deciding which of the many immunotherapy options, either alone or combination will achieve the desired effect.

A large multinational phase 3 clinical trial sponsored by the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (@SITCancer) was set up to validate Immunoscore® as a biomarker in Stage 2 colon cancer.

Dr Galon and co-authors reported the results at ASCO 2016. See post: immunoscore validated as an important biomarker for colon cancer. He featured on the ASCO 2016 episode of the Novel Targets Podcast: Immunotherapy or Bust.

Immunoscore® is now being commercialised by Marseille based HalioDx(See post: HalioDx CEO Vincent Fert outlines commercial strategy for Immunoscore in US and Europe).

ciml40During a recent visit to the Marseille Immunopôle for #CIML40, I had the pleasure to do an impromptu tour of the HalioDx lab.

When listening/watching this, do bear in mind this was not a scripted tour, and also the people I spoke to were speaking English as a second language.

It’s not intended to be a definitive guide; if you are a patient you should talk to your doctor about any questions you have about diagnostic assays such as Immunoscore.  At the moment, it’s only available for research or clinical trial use, but HalioDx has plans to make the assay commercially available on the US and Europe.

The company has more information on their website and also recently published a paper in the Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer (open access) that describes how the test is done in more scientific detail.

In the meantime, subscribers can login to join me for a lunch-time tour, or you can purchase access below. The audio-slideshow tour was for several weeks open access and available to all, but is now for subscribers only:

New Orleans American Queen

New Orleans, American Queen

After yesterday’s enlightening conversation on novel ways to jumpstart the immune system including OX40, vaccines, and STING with a self-confessed radicalist aka cancer immunologist (Dr Bernard Fox), we now turn to a self-described optimist for an industry perspective on oncology R&D and Part 2 of our anti-OX40 mini-series:

  • What ideas and challenges need to be considered in order to develop a new agent against a novel target, alone or in combination with another unapproved agent?
  • We know that mouse models and biomarkers aren’t optimal yet, so how do those issues and other factors influence decision making and clinical trial design?
  • It’s not so easy as many think – there are way more unknowns than knowns – so how do companies go about tackling them?
  • What can we learn from the readouts?

To learn more, subscribers can login or you can click on the blue box below to purchase a subscription and read the OX40 mini-series, as well as our comprehensive AACR coverage…

At the recent annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), one controversial area that arose was centred around targeting OX40, a stimulatory checkpoint. We’ve written extensively about anti-OX40 checkpoint agonists on the blog in the past.

Targeting OX40 is an area of interest to several companies looking to improve the effectiveness of checkpoint inhibitors. As a result, several companies have OX40 agonists in development, including AstraZeneca/MedImmune, Roche/Genentech, Pfizer, GSK and Incyte/Agenus, for example, making it a competitive target and interesting race to market.

Meanwhile, in their recent 1Q earnings call, Roche announced that they expect to present clinical data on their PD-L1/OX40 combination at the forthcoming American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago from June 4th to 7th. This therefore makes it a timely moment to reflect on the data generated so far and what we can expect next month.

In New Orleans, we spoke to several researchers who are active in the OX40 field, since there were both mouse and human data presented at this year’s conference.

The interviews conducted were wide-ranging and informative, so in our latest mini-series we explore Part 1 today with Part 2 tomorrow.  They are relaxed fireside chats with different experts included in each to discuss their data (and other relevant topics) presented in New Orleans.

This way, you’ll be able to follow along and find out where the common areas are, as well as the differences in perspectives, and even where we could be headed in the near future.

This latest series on OX40 agonists raises many intriguing questions that we hope may be answered at ASCO and other clinical meetings going forward. We also discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with research into cancer immunotherapy combinations.

Dr Bernard Fox at #AACR16

Dr Bernard Fox at #AACR16

Intriguing preclinical data in mice models were presented by Dr David Messenheimer (Portland). We spoke with the senior author of that abstract, Dr Bernard Fox.

He is the Harder Family Chair for Cancer Research and Chief of the Laboratory of Molecular and Tumour Immunology at the Earle A. Chiles Research Institute in Portland, Oregon, and a leading cancer immunotherapy expert. He’s also the CEO of UbiVac, a biotech spin-off from Chiles in 2005 to develop therapeutic vaccines for cancer and infectious diseases.

Subscribers can login to read more on where “the rubber is hitting the road” in cancer immunotherapy clinical research.

If you’re not already a subscriber, you can purchase access to AACR posts and also our immuno-oncology coverage by clicking on the blue icon below.

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