Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘EORTC Molecular Targets 2014’

Ovarian cancer is an often neglected area in cancer drug development and historically has often been one of the last solid tumours to be evaluated as part of a life cycle management program. There are a number of reasons for this, but recently that situation has begun to change as our knowledge of the underlying biology improves and new agents are developed that target the particular oncogenic aberrations.

It is a tumour type that ranks 5th in cancer deaths amongst women and accounts for more deaths than any other gynaecologic cancer. Indeed, in 2014 nearly 22,000 women are estimated to be diagnosed with this cancer in the U.S. and approx. 14,000 will likely die from the disease.

Earlier this month the FDA approved bevacizumab (Avastin) in combination with chemotherapy (paclitaxel plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin or topetecan) for the treatment of platinum-resistant, recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who have received no more than two prior therapies. The approval was based on the phase 3 AURELIA trial (n=361), which demonstrated an improvement in median progression free survival (PFS) of 6.8 vs. 3.4 months (HR 0.38, P<0.0001). This means that the women in the trial saw a 62% reduction in the risk of their symptoms worsening compared to chemotherapy alone.

Surprisingly, this advance represented the first new treatment option in this setting for 15 years!

The good news is that beyond Avastin, there are a number of other promising agents in development for ovarian cancer. At this year’s EORTC-AACR-NCI Molecular Targets meeting held in Barcelona, new data was presented on several such compounds that are well worth highlighting.

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The embargoed press release and abstract for Clovis’s CO–1686 (rociletinib) in advanced lung cancer patients with and without the T790M mutation, originally scheduled for Friday morning in Barcelona, was released last night. The actual presentation is slated for Friday, November 21 during the Plenary session from 11:00 to 13:00 CET.

Thus the ongoing race to market in this segment continues apace, as do the fairly robust and determined discussions on the topic.  Without much further ado to read more about our quick insights and reactions to the data, you can sign up or sign in below.

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ENA2014_Banner_400x250The annual Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics jointly run by the EORTC, NCI and AACR (aka “the Triple meeting”), starts tomorrow in Barcelona (Twitter hashtag #ENA2014).

This makes it a particularly busy week on the conference calendar as we segue from immunotherapy at SITC to Molecular Targets, not to mention the start of our previews on hematologic malignancies at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) coming up fast!

The Triple symposium alternates between the US and Europe. In case you missed it, here’s a link to our extensive coverage from last year’s Boston Molecular Targets Symposium that we attended.

This year in Barcelona, one of the highlights is the presentation of the latest clinical data for the phase 1 trial of AG-120 (Agios), an inhibitor of the IDH1 enzyme.

As the abstract that will be presented tomorrow by Daniel Pollyea, MD (University of Colorado, Denver) notes, “Cancer metabolism represents an emerging field of novel cancer target discovery.” Along with epigenetics, it’s an exciting area that we are actively following. For years metabolism has been promising to breakthrough with new ideas that move the needle in clinical research but few have lived up to the lofty expectations, with one exception.

We first wrote Agios back in 2012, when they showed that that mutations of the metabolic gene IDH1 were consistent with that of a cancer causing oncogene in glioblastoma.

Then at ASH 2013, we heard the preclinical data for AG-221 using IDH2 mutant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) xenografts and interviewed the Agios CEO, Dr David Schenkein. The story for AG-221 continued in a positive vein with early clinical data at AACR and ASCO earlier this year. You can read more in the related posts we’ve highlighted at  the end of this article.

Tomorrow at EORTC-NCI-AACR Molecular Targets in Barcelona we will hear about the preliminary results for the phase 1 trial of AG-120 in patients with advanced hematological malignancies including those with relapsed or refractory AML, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and elderly untreated AML that harbor an IDH1 mutation.

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