Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘gastric cancer’

San Francisco: A look at what’s new in gastric cancer (GC) from the 2017 ASCO GI meeting.

Day 1 of #GI17 is filling up…

There were several phase 3 trials presented in GC and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) carcinoma in both targeted therapies and immunotherapies this past weekend.

  • When we look carefully at the latest data, what do we find?
  • Where are the opportunities and challenges in this niche?

Another critical question that many observers will be interested in is…

Will BMS’s checkpoint inhibitor, nivolumab (Opdivo), overcome recent setbacks in lung cancer and make a mark in stomach cancer to challenge approved targeted therapies such as ramucirumab (Cyramza)?

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Updated data are often presented at conferences and therefore the results can differ from the submitted abstracts, which are sometimes submitted as placeholders based on immature data cutoffs. That was certainly the case in several examples at the ASCO GI conference in San Francisco last weekend.

San Francisco HerculesAfter Monday’s look at new developments in the lower GI tract, we now turn our attention today to the upper GI tract with a focus on oesophageal, gastric (stomach), and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancers.

Over the last five years we have seen new approvals for targeted therapies such as HER2+ gastric cancer and relapsed refarctory gastric cancers with a VEGF inhibitor. Will that trend continue over the next five years or will we see new approaches such as immunotherapy enter the market and dominate?

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Franciscan Crab Restaurant San FranciscoWe saw at ASCO last year that response to checkpoint immunotherapy is feasible in some patients with colorectal cancer, but what about other gastrointestinal tumours such as pancreatic, duodenal and biliary cancers?

Can their activity extend beyond the obvious hypermutated tumours such as melanoma, lung, renal and bladder cancers?

Many of you will know that most pancreatic cancers, for example, are detected late and prognosis in metastatic disease is generally poor. You also typically don’t see much coverage of the other GI non-CRC cancers from cancer conferences in the medical media outside of pancreatic cancer occasionally.

At the ASCO Gastrointestinal symposium (#GI16) this past weekend, there was some new data of note in these tumour types that is well worth highlighting and discussing because it may have a major impact on the GI landscape.

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