Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘GDC-0199’

This week certainly turned out to be a defining tale of two drugs with a chequered history…

Lion DancersFirst off, the FDA approved AbbVie/Genentech’s venetoclax, now known as Venclexta, in a subset of CLL patients with 17p deletions. These patients have a historically poor prognosis and the approval goes some way to addressing the high unmet medical need.

Secondly, another biotech company, Clovis Oncology, got slammed by ODAC with a 12-1 vote to wait for phase 3 data from the TIGER-3 trial for rociletinib to better determine the efficacy:safety benefit profile.

For a long while it seemed that AbbVie had nothing but toil and trouble over the tumour lysis syndrome (TLS) issues giving them some significant challenges to overcome, while Clovis were one of the new darlings of Wall Street.

In the final dash to the market, the tables were turned almost at the 11th hour and fortunes stunningly reversed.  Yet a mere eighteen months ago, few industry watchers would have predicted the difference in outcomes.

In our latest AACR Preview series, we take a look at Bcl2 inhibition and where some of the emerging opportunities might lie based on new preclinical research that is being presented here in New Orleans this weekend.  It makes for interesting reading.

While one tiger is licking its wounds, another is smacking it chops at what the future might hold for new combination approaches; how the tails have literally turned.

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We have followed the roller coaster development of the Bcl2 inhibitor, venetoclax (ABT–199/GDC–0199), for several years now.  There have been some lowlights along the way, but lately, things have been much rosier for AbbVie and Genentech as a more sensible dosing and patient management approach has been paying off.

Recently at ASCO and ASH, we have seen encouraging new data emerge in leukemia (AML and CLL), lymhomas (NHL), and even multiple myeloma.

New data has now emerged that looks quite interesting in another blood disorder. Today, we took a look at the data and also the potential implications for venetoclax’s development program.

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Last month’s Biotech Strategy mailbag – where we answer questions from subscribers – turned out to be rather controversial with strong feelings running in several camps on Puma Biotech’s neratinib in breast cancer.

This time around we have a bunch of questions on completely different topics and compounds to cover:

  • BRAF plus MEK and/or immunotherapy in BRAFV600 metastatic melanoma
  • Immunogen’s IMGN853 – now known as mirvetuximab soravtansine – in platinum resistant ovarian cancer
  • AbbVie/Genentech’s ABT–199/GDC–0199 venetoclax

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One of the things I most enjoy in cancer research is hearing wonderful patient stories from oncologists who are at the coal face of clinical trials. They get to deal with death and dying every day and like those in Pharma R&D, also live for the successes, the drugs that make it through pipeline despite great odds against them and make a meaningful impact on the daily lives of ordinary people.

We’ve all heard topline data presented at medical conferences around the world, but what the summary data can’t tell you is how a drug can impact people in ways that are clinically meaningful yet are more obtuse to capture in the aggregate. This is why case studies at CME sessions are increasingly popular, because they add value and context to common issues in a way that a Kaplan-Meier curve can never do.

Zydelig_logoWith the flurry of recent US and EU approvals for obinutuzumab (Gazyva), ibrutinib (Imbruvica) and the newest kid on the block, idelalisib (Zydelig), in CLL and indolent lymphomas, I wanted to take a look at these drugs from a different perspective.

A reader wrote in asking which of these new agents would emerge the winner and why?

Today’s post therefore offers some thoughts on the emerging CLL landscape now that we are shifting from new product development to the marketplace.

Drugs mentioned: Gazyva, Imbruvica, Zydelig, ABT–199/GDC–0199, Arzerra, IPI–145, CTL–019
Companies: Roche/Genentech, J&J/Pharmacyclics, Gilead, GSK, Infinity, Novartis

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Previously, we discussed the role of new agents being developed for aggressive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) with Dr Nancy Valente of Genentech, particularly how their antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) could have a potential role to play in revolutionizing treatment for patients with an otherwise poor prognosis.

The second half of the interview from ASCO 2014 focuses on more indolent disease, namely chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and the role of their novel therapeutics obinutuzumab (Gazyva) and ABT–199/GDC–0199.

We’ve heard a lot of positive data about the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, obinutuzumab, but the Bcl2 inhibitor undergoing co-development with AbbVie has had a bit of a chequered history to date. There is no doubt that ABT–199/GDC-0199 is highly potent, while lacking the severe myelosuppressive effects (thrombocytopenia) of its predecessor, navitoclax — which can be both a blessing and a curse — as the phase I single agent investigators discovered recently when severe tumour lysis lead to two sudden patient deaths.

It is important to address these issues expeditiously in a safe and rational way to ensure patient safety for those who enroll in both current and future trials. This is a critical issue we discussed at length with Dr Valente and how the company has been handling it.

At the AACR Molecular Targets meeting last November, many readers will remember that we learned about Genentech’s research plans for combinations with GDC–0199 in CLL and NHL in an interview with one of the scientists for that program, Dr Deepak Sampath.

Today, it’s time to look at where and how this exciting agent might impact CLL. Obviously, both CLL and NHL have commonalties and overlap, since they are both B cell disorders, so often what works in one disease often works well in the other too, as rituximab has clearly demonstrated.

To learn more about these insights and how ABT–199/GDC–0199 could impact the future CLL landscape, you can sign in or sign up below.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and indolent non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (iNHL) have received significant attention over the last two years. More exciting new therapies than ever before – with multiple different mechanisms of action – have either recently come to market or are in development. There is an ongoing revolution in the CLL landscape and treatment of the disease, which above all else is good news for patients! As part of our ongoing longitudinal coverage, there’s a lot to discuss and catch up on in Chicago at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

What’s different at ASCO this year?

Basically, a LOT more data – it’s almost a tsunami considering this is ASCO and not the American Society of Hematology (ASH) annual meeting!  I am excited to see that there is so much new data at ASCO. Yesterday, we highlighted 3 key sessions for multiple myeloma. For CLL/SLL and iNHL there are 9 – to put the sheer breadth of data and studies in context. This includes ongoing phase 1-3 trials, as well as new randomised controlled phase 3 studies that are now open and enrolling patients. If successful, some of these latter studies will play a crucial part in future registration packages to the Health Authorities. In the past, we have talked extensively about CD19 antibodies such as obinutuzumab (Gazyva) and BTK inhibitors such as ibrutinib (Imbruvica). Both of these drugs are now approved and available in the US.

Other therapies in development we have covered in the past have included PI3K inhibitors delta (idelalisib) and delta, gamma (IPI-145), as well as Bcl2 inhibitors (ABT-199 / GDC-0199), SYK inhibitors (fostamatinib and GS-9973), and CAR T cell therapies such as CTL019. To find out more about our insights on the ever-changing CLL landscape, you can sign in or sign up below.

Now that the last of the 2013 cancer conference season is finally over, we’re going to run a couple of post meeting summaries this week from ASH as a few subscribers have asked for the Cliff Notes version of what was hot – or not in the context of the market.

New treatments for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) was one of the hot topics at the recent annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in New Orleans.

Hot on the heels of Roche’s recent FDA approval for Gazyva (obinutuzumab/GA101) in CLL, other companies in the race to market including:

  • Pharmacyclics and Johnson & Johnson (ibrutinib)
  • Gilead (idelalisib, GS-9973)
  • Infinity (IPI-145)
  • AbbVie and Roche (ABT-199/GDC-0199)
  • Novartis (CTL019).

Here’s my subjective and personal assessment of the winners and losers based on the data presented:

ASH for me always starts on a Saturday, as Friday is taken up with travel and a Super Friday corporate symposium, if any manage to catch our interest.

The start this year was somewhat disrupted by an ice storm that hit many southern states, causing considerable chaos for many ASH attendees – flights, hotels, bags, meetings, interviews, Ad Boards, investigator meetings, poster sessions and presentations etc.

I did enjoy the B cell malignancies CME session yesterday afternoon. Although it was sponsored by Gilead, it was well balanced and included discussion on FCR, ibrutinib, idelalisib, IPI-145, TGR-1202, ABT-199 and several earlier investigational compounds.

The highlight for me was Susan O’Brien’s thoughtful and philosophical talk on where are we going with CLL?

It’s an important question for physicians to start asking themselves with Gazyva approved in CLL, Imbruvica (ibrutinib) is pending in CLL and idelalisib expected to gain approval in 2014.

The chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) landscape has been one of the most dynamic and exciting over the last 12 months, with many new therapies emerging against different targets from CD20 to BCR signaling, Bcl2 to the PI3K pathway. Other new targets may also soon emerge.

The annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) in New Orleans sets the scene for the rollout of more mature data and affords an early evaluation of where the various companies competing in this space may shake out.  Given that we are moving beyond traditional chemoimmunotherapy to evaluate several newer classes of therapy including B cell receptor (BCR) and PI3K signaling, anti-CD20 antibodies, anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T cell technology (CART) it looks to be shaking out to an exciting conference.

Companies mentioned: Roche/Genentech, Gilead, Pharmacyclics, Abbott, Celgene, Infinity, Incyte, ONO, Amgen, TG Therapeutics, Novartis

Products discussed: rituximab, bendamustine, obinutuzumab, idelalisib, ibrutinib, ABT-199, CC-292, GS-9973, IPI-145, ONO-4059, INCB40093, AMG 319, TGR-1202, CTL-019

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today approved Roche/Genentech’s obinutuzumab (Gazyva), also known as GA101, for untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) in combination with the chemotherapy chlorambucil. Updated CLL11 trial data will be presented at the 2013 annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (twitter #ASH13) in New Orleans from December 7-10. Gazyva is the first drug with a Breakthrough Therapy Designation to be approved by the FDA.

“Gazyva is an important new medicine for people with newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia as it more than doubled the time a person lived without their disease worsening compared to chlorambucil alone,” said Hal Barron, M.D., chief medical officer and head of Global Product Development in a press release this morning.

Blog readers who attended the Roche analyst event in Chicago during the ASCO annual meeting in June will have noted that Roche’s long-term corporate strategy is focused on combining cancer drugs to improve treatment outcomes; a theme echoed by Charles Sawyers, President of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) during his ASCO Science of Oncology award lecture on “Overcoming Resistance to Cancer Drug Therapy“.

One of the combinations that Roche COO Daniel O’Day highlighted in the analyst event at ASCO was obinutuzumab/GA101 (Gazyva) with GDC-0199 (ABT-199) for the treatment of B-cell hematological malignancies such as CLL & non Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Obinutuzumab is a glyco-engineered CD20 antibody, while GDC-0199 is a Bcl-2 inhibitor. Both cause apoptosis (cell death) through complementary mechanisms of action.

An abstract on the preclinical data for this combination will be presented at the ASH annual meeting in New Orleans. A phase 1 clinical trial in CLL with this combination is currently underway and recruiting patients (NCT01685892).

I had the great pleasure at the recent AACR-NCI-EORTC Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics meeting in Boston to talk with Deepak Sampath, PhD the leader of Genentech’s Bcl-2 preclinical research about the rational for the obinutuzumab plus GDC-0199 combination.

In this SoundCloud, Dr Sampath introduces himself and what his lab does at Genentech: What he said during the interview makes for interesting reading, and suggests this combo could have blockbuster potential!
Subscribers to Premium Content can read a transcript of the interview below:

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