Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘INCB054329’

The BET Bromodomain market is a meaty epigenetics topic we have followed for several years now, including a look at the space back in 2013 on the old Pharma Strategy Blog (Link). The last update on this was ironically at AACR last year when we discussed MYC and bromodomains (Link).

Nawlins Mardi GrasIn a remarkable tale of two cities in real life, two companies we discussed in those posts – Constellation Pharma and Tensha Therapeutics – have had markedly different fortunes since then. Roche decided to end their collaboration with the former and went on to acquire the latter instead.

Since we first wrote about bromodomains and BET inhibitors, the niche has exploded in a wildly stunning way… More drugs in the pipeline, more tumour targets being explored, and even novel combinations being evaluated preclinically for synergistic or additive effects. Even I was surprised by how competitive this niche has become based on the offerings at AACR this year.

With all the wealth of new data at the AACR annual meeting and also some other recent presentations I’ve attended elsewhere, it’s time for a more in-depth look at the BET/Bromodomain landscape.

Who are the new players, which tumour targets are now being evaluated, which combinations might be useful?

A word to the wise – this is neither a nerdy science post nor a comprehensive literature review – instead we take a look at the emerging landscape from a new product development perspective.

Science has been absolutely critical to success in all of the cancer therapeutics from targeted therapies to immunotherapies that have emerged in the last decade.

It really doesn’t matter whether you come from a marketing and commercial organisation or the investment community – if you want to make great decisions, you need to understand the basics of the science underpinning the R&D, where the strengths and weaknesses are. The alternative is play Roulette and put everything on Black 11 as a euphemism for whichever company/product/target you have an interest in.

To learn more about this burgeoning niche in epigenetics, subscribers can log-in or you can sign-up via the Blue Box below:

St Charles Streetcar New OrleansIt’s Day 4 of our Road to AACR 2016 mini-series

In the run up to the start of the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) that takes place in New Orleans from April 16 -20, we’re highlighting some of the hot topics and interesting targets with data to be presented at the meeting (Twitter #AACR16).

We’ll be providing conference coverage from AACR both during and after the meeting. The program this year offers a veritable smorgasbord of choices, particularly in cancer immunotherapy. It’s going to be hard to cover every session we want to attend!

AACR will be webcasting many presentations, however, much of the work presented and discussed at AACR is unpublished and/or still a work in progress, so do check if a talk you are interested in will be webcast or not. The online meeting calendar indicates whether permission has been given and if all the slides will be included. If you really want to hear something do get to meeting rooms early; we expect the cancer immunotherapy sessions will be especially popular!

In today’s post we’re looking at what’s new at AACR 2016 for cancer immunotherapies that target IDO1 and TDO and their downstream effectors.

Tumor cells and myeloid cells in the microenvironment express high levels of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1). IDO1 is a rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of the amino acid tryptophan (TRP). Depletion of tryptophan inhibits T cell responses.

Another route by which the tryptophan metabolic pathway can lead to immunosuppression is via the enzyme TRP-2,3-dioxygenase 2 (TDO), which may be an additional target for cancer immunotherapy. Some IDO1 inhibitors also inhibit TDO, others don’t, which makes for an interesting question as to whether you need a dual-targeted approach or not?

In this post we’re looking at:

  • Some of the companies who have IDO1/TDO inhibitors in development – there is a surprising amount of activity!
  • What is the right combination partner?
  • Who is most likely to benefit from IDO1/TDO cancer immunotherapy?

Data at AACR 2016 may help us answer some of the above questions, and we’ve showcased a few of the relevant sessions and presentations for your AACR “dance card” if this is an area of interest.

Subscribers can login to read more or you can purchase access below. This post is Day 4 of our Road to AACR 2016 mini-series.

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