Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Johann De Bono’

The recent AACR-NCI-EORTC Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics international conference in San Francisco was an informative meeting.

What I particularly liked was the strategic overview that took place in many of the plenary sessions.

As an example, Johann de Bono, Professor of Experimental Cancer Medicine at The Institute of Cancer Research/The Royal Marsden in London highlighted the potential drug development targets based on prostate cancer biology:

  • Androgen Receptor (AR)
  • Heat Shock Proteins (Hsp)
  • Signaling: HER3, MET, IGF-1R, CCL2, IL-6, Src
  • PI3K/AKT/TOR signaling
  • PARP and BRCAness
  • Estrogen receptor (ER)
  • c-MYC & CHK1

His presentation discussed the possible therapeutic approaches, and complexity involved in developing novel targeted therapies for prostate cancer.

This is something that I expect we will hear more of at the AACR special conference on Advances in Prostate Cancer Research early next year.

In particular, de Bono discussed drug development strategies to target androgen receptor signaling, and some of the future challenges including:

  • Proving to the regulatory authorities that circulating tumor cell (CTC) count falls are a robust immediate endpoint of overall survival
  • Developing improved imaging for bone metastases

As a side note, there were several posters for cabozantinib (XL184) at the meeting (available on the Exelixis website), including preliminary research on computer-aided quantitative bone scan assessment.

However, as de Bono mentioned in his presentation, “diffusion weighted MRI shows hot spots not detected by bone scans.”

2010 and 2011 were good years for prostate cancer drugs, and with new approvals for MDV3100 and radium-223 (Alpharadin) expected, 2012 is set to be another “grand cru” year, to paraphase Bertrand Tombal.

If you were not able to make it to San Francisco for the Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics conference, webcasts of many sessions will be available on the AACR site.


The Oncologist Journal of the Society for Translational Oncology (STO) has published a video recording on prostate cancer that is well worth watching for those with an interest in this area.

At their Sept 8, 2011 CME symposium held in Belfast, a roundtable was held entitled “Prostate Cancer: Progress & Promise.”

Moderated by Bruce A. Chabner (Mass General/Harvard), the panelists were Joe O’Sullivan (Queen’s University, Belfast), Johann De Bono (The Institute for Cancer Research) and David Waugh (Queen’s University, Belfast).

Professor de Bono in the video comments that”

“with regards to our dream of eventually treating men with prostate cancer without castrating them, which must be our ultimate goal and curing them of cancer. I think we will have to focus on for example drugs targeting ERG or ERG signaling.”

Chabner then asks the good question of whether ERG is a druggable target?

To which De Bono replies that you can drug ERG by inhibiting PARP and references a paper by the Chinnaiyan group published in the May 2011 issue of Cancer Cell.

PARP inhibition represents an interesting area of prostate cancer research.

If you would like to know more, Sally Church, PhD has written about this on Pharma Strategy Blog.  See posts on “TMPRSS2: ERG may be a more useful marker than PSA in prostate cancer” and “Personalized Therapy for Prostate Cancer – is it possible?

In the STO video, De Bono discusses why he would like to replace bone scans in prostate cancer with another imaging modality that more accurately reflects the activity of the disease. Future possibilities include use of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging and novel PET tracers.

There’s also a good discussion about Alpharadin for those interested in some anecdotal commentary on experiences with it.

Another notable comment by De Bono is his belief that “taxanes work in prostate cancer primarily by targeting androgen receptor signaling.” Taxanes have typically been thought to target mitosis.

De Bono goes on to say that clinical trial data being submitted for publication shows that patients who are refractory to abiraterone, are also refractory to docetaxel when they progress on it.  The suggestion is that there may be cross resistance between abiraterone and taxanes with a subgroup of patients who just don’t do well on androgen receptor (AR) targeting drugs.  The reason for this isn’t yet clear.

A new phase 2 clinical trial is starting soon that will look at the sequencing of abiraterone and cabazitaxel.  One group will receive abiraterone followed by cabazitaxel, the other cabazitaxel followed by abiraterone.

The Belfast STO symposium was the second in a three part series. The next one will be held during ASCO GU in San Francisco next year.

Another potentially useful meeting in this area is the February 2012 AACR workshop on “Advances in Prostate Cancer Research” chaired by Arul Chinnaiyan & Charles Sawyers.

Prostate cancer remains an exciting therapeutic area to watch with tremendous progress and promise of late.

Today at the European Association of Urology (EAU) annual meeting in Vienna, the big news was that 2010 was a “Grand Cru” year for new treatments for advanced prostate cancer.  Not only that, but sanofi-aventis announced that they had received European marketing approval for cabazitaxel (Jevtana®) in metastatic hormone resistance prostate cancer mHRPC.

The fact that there are now several new treatments available (or expected to be available in the not too distant future) is good news for patients and physicians.

What is interesting about prostate cancer is that it in terms of incidence it is comparable to breast cancer, yet seems to end up with far fewer resources and publicity.  Prostate cancer is to men, what breast cancer is to women.

The EAU 2011 Congress website has a variety of podcasts and webcasts of presentations, and I encourage anyone interested in the latest developments to check out the wealth of information they offer.  In particular, the presentation by Professor Johann De Bono from the Royal Marsden in the high risk prostate cancer plenary session today was one of my highlights of the meeting.

The take home message I obtained from EAU in Vienna is the excitement of new treatment options for castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) such as cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T and abiraterone.  The challenge may well be to work out how best to use these new therapies, ie in what sequence and what potential combinations may evolve in the future.

However, as Professor Bertrand Tombal from Louvain in Belgium declared, 2010 was a Grand Cru for new prostate cancer treatments.  That is good news indeed.


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