Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘MPDL3280A Bladder Cancer’

Gumbo Shop New OrleansThe annual meeting of the 2015 American Urological Assoication (AUA) is being held in New Orleans… Yes, we’re on the third and final leg of our Louisiana trip encompassing AAI, ASGCT and now the triumvirate of AUA-SBUR-SUO.

This morning, I attended the Urologic Oncology Research Symposium, “High impact science in urologic oncology and progress in biomedical imaging.”  In particular, I was keen to hear about the latest research in urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) with regards to checkpoint blockade with anti-PDL1 and PD-1 therapies.

In the past, any session on bladder cancer guaranteed the lucky (or hapless) presenters with an audience of a dozen or so people.  Not any more – the room was packed with standing room only very quickly – a nice change for a disease that has seen no new therapies for 30 years.

Part of this renewed enthusiasm is due to the excitement for the checkpoint therapies making a huge impact in this disease, at least in clinical trials to date. While waiting for the session to start, one urologist I spoke to told me he bought the ASCO Virtual Meeting last year just to hear Dr Tom Powles talk on anti-PDL1 therapy with MPDL3280A in advanced urothelial cancer. What did you think of it, I asked?

“Wow, just wow!”

Later this month an update on the more mature data from that phase I trial is due at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) from Dr Daniel Petrylak (Yale)… who just happened to be one of the presenters at AUA this morning.

He discussed the checkpoint data with atezolizumab (MPDL3280A) in urothelial bladder cancer, as well as the pembrolizumab data from ESMO last fall and what’s happening with nivolumab. These drugs are quite different in many ways, not just in terms of the efficacy, but also in terms of the biomarker data, as we discovered today.

To learn more about the latest checkpoint data, including an update on biomarkers, you can login in or sign up in the box below.

Nature Cover Checkpoint InhibitorsIn a landmark publication today, the prestigious journal Nature includes five “Letters” regarding checkpoint blockade of the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligand PD-L1. It confirms the promise and potential of the emerging field of immuno-oncology to provide durable and long lasting responses in many cancers.

Readers of the blog will already have read about the stunning early data presented at ASCO this year for the engineered humanized antibody MPDL3280A (Genentech/Roche) in urothelial bladder cancer (UBC). In his Nature Letter, Thomas Powles (Barts) and colleagues sum of the significance of this data in the opening sentence:

“There have been no major advances for the treatment of metastatic urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) in the last 30 years.”

On the basis of this data, MPDL3280A received Breaththrough Therapy Designation from the FDA earlier this year.

Roy Herbst (Yale) and colleagues in their Nature Letter write about biomakers of PD-L1 inhibition and how their data “suggest that MPDL3280A is most effective in patients in which pre-existing immunity is suppressed by PD-L1, and is reinvigorated on antibody treatment.

At the recent annual meeting of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), Dr Herbst gave one of the best presentations of the meeting, in which he discussed Personalized Immunotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.  His top ten lessons learned kept the audience’s attention throughout.

In this excerpt from an interview he kindly gave BSB afterwards, he talks about the promise of cancer immunotherapy in lung cancer:

 

Tomorrow is the Thanksgiving holiday in the United States, so this will be the only post this week. Thanksgiving is a good time to take a moment out of the hectic life we all live to “smell the roses” and express gratitude for all the positive things around us.

Next week sees the start of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) annual meeting in San Francisco. The cancer conference circuit seems to roll quickly from one meeting to the next at the moment. There’s a lot of promising data, and while we can’t discuss the data before the meeting due to ASH embargo restrictions, next week we will be highlighting some of the presentations we are particularly looking forward to.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Subscribers can login below or you can purchase access to read more detail about all five Nature Letters, and their implications for the emerging field of immuno-oncology.

Tower of London Field of Poppies

ESMO 2014 Bladder CancerCancer immunotherapy, the ability to harness the body’s own immune system to fight cancer, is showing early promise in bladder cancer.

“Breathing new life into bladder cancer treatment” was the title of the excellent discussion by Maria De Dantis (Vienna) of data presented at the recent ESMO Congress in Madrid.

Advanced bladder cancer has a particularly poor prognosis. Once the cancer has spread in the body, according to Cancer Research UK, the average survival time is approximately a year to 18 months.

There is clearly an unmet medical need for effective new treatments, with no major treatment advances for over 30 years. To date, targeted agents in the second-line setting have shown only incremental progression free survival and generally low overall response rates.

Which is why it’s exciting to see hope for patients with urothelial bladder cancer from new inhibitors of the PD-1 immune checkpoint signalling pathway.

At ASCO this year, data for Roche/Genentech’s anti PD-L1 (MPDL3280A) was presented (Abstract 5011) by Thomas Powles (Barts, London). Commenting on the data, in her post “Making a difference in advanced bladder cancer” Sally noted, “it wouldn’t have been out of place in the Plenary session, frankly.”

Recognizing the potential based on the promise of the early clinical data, on May 31st the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation (BTD) to MPDL3280A in bladder cancer.

ESMO 2014 Bladder Cancer Session ChairsIf you need to catch up on immuno-oncology, we have a growing library of posts on Biotech Strategy Blog, and we’ll be continuing our coverage of the rapid progress in this area at the forthcoming annual meeting of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), which takes place at National Harbor, MD from Nov 6 -9.

At ESMO 2014, phase 1 clinical trial data in bladder cancer was presented for both Pembrolizumab (Merck) and MPDL3280A (Roche/Genentech).

Subscribers can login in to read how the two drugs compared in this indication, or you can purchase access by clicking on the blue icon below.

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