Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘NIH’

Richard Schilsky in Science Translational Medicine describes the challenges of enrolling patients into ever more complex cancer clinical trials. It is estimated that only 3-5% of cancer patients participate in clinical trials. Can social media be used to overcome barriers to enrollment?

There are many barriers to enrollment such as a lack of incentive by the physician if they can prescribe the drug off-label and obtain reimbursement, the additional legal liability, time required for research documentation and the need to follow human protection requirements such as informed consent and obtain Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval.

There’s also the issue of equipoise, the uncertainty as to whether a new treatment will be beneficial or not and the need to discuss with a patient their willingness to accept the risk that a new treatment may offer less benefit than the current standard of care. This topic is beyond the scope of this post.

Schilsky notes in his commentary that:

“trial start-up times have lengthened to an average of 2 years or longer, up to 40% of cooperative group phase III trials have failed to complete accrual and closed without achieving study endpoints, wasting the contribution of those patients willing to enroll in the trial.”

Time to market is key to the success of biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry, with product life governed by patent years. Delays in time to market have a real ROI impact, and may lead to promising products being discontinued prematurely.

One of the barriers to enrollment noted in Schilsky’s highlights is “insufficient patient awareness/demand.” Can social media play a role in overcoming this?

To look at what is happening currently, I used Storify, a new tool that allows you to create stories using social media:

http://storify.com/3nt/using-social-media-to-recruit-for-cancer-clinical-

Reference

ResearchBlogging.orgSchilsky, R. (2011). Accrual to Cancer Clinical Trials in the Era of Molecular Medicine Science Translational Medicine, 3 (75), 75-75 DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3001712

As those of you who have been following my conference schedule already know, I will be at Health Journalism 2011 in Philadelphia later this week.  The annual meeting of the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) runs from April 14-17.

It’s my first time at an AHCJ conference, and in my first video blog post I have shared why I am going and what I hope to obtain from the meeting.

Some of the expert sessions that I am particularly looking forward to are on:

Spotting fraud in scientific research (moderated by Ivan Oransky, M.D. executive editor, Reuters Health; blogger, Retraction Watch and Embargo Watch)

Efforts to revive the drug delivery pipeline (moderated by Ed Silverman, editor-at-large, Med Ad News and R&D Directions)

Understanding nanotechnology’s role in fighting cancer (moderated by Eric Rosenthal, special correspondent, Oncology Times)

Best practices in blogging and social media (moderated by Scott Hensley, health blog writer and editor, National Public Radio)

As William Heisel states in an excellent blog post on Reporting on Health, the journalism stars have come out for ACHJ Health Journalism conference in Philadelphia. I am looking forward to an exciting and informative meeting. Hope to see you there.

 

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