Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘niraparib ESMO16’

One of the surprise controversies at ESMO16 was the fall-out between Myriad Genetics (NASDAQ: MYGN) and Tesaro (NASDAQ: TSRO) over whether the company’s PARP inhibitor, niraparib, should require a companion diagnostic for the treatment of women with platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer in the maintenance setting. We previously wrote about this from Copenhagen (Link).



Tesaro were so keen on controlling their message, in the run-up to ESMO, they even went to the trouble of taking out a legal injunction against Myriad Genetics in an attempt to prevent them publishing their own press release discussing the niraparib data.

We knew about this “off the record” at ESMO, but it’s now a matter of public knowledge and John Carroll admirably reported the story on Endpoints last week (Link).

It is a sad reflection on any biotech partnership or pharma alliance if you can’t reach an agreement in private, and have to resort to an injunction in US Federal Court. Doubly unfortunate when you lose the injunction too!

As many readers are already aware, back in June 2014 AstraZeneca failed to convince an FDA ODAC about the merits of olaparib in the same indication that Tesaro are seeking. This is why the data for Tesaro and their regulatory/commercial approach justifies careful scrutiny.

What’s more, data from Myriad Genetics was key to AstraZeneca obtaining a subsequent indication for olaparib in more advanced ovarian cancer, so their experience in this space cannot be dismissed.


Johnathan M. Lancaster MD PhD

At ESMO, the Myriad Genetics Laboratory Chief Medical Officer, Dr Johnathan Lancaster kindly spoke to BSB.

He shared his perspective on the niraparib data and why a companion diagnostic should be considered based on the NOVA trial data presented by Dr Mansoor Mirza. You can read more about the data in The NEJM paper that was published simultaneously (Link).

Dr Lancaster was formerly Director of the Center for Women’s Oncology, and Chair of the Department of Women’s Oncology at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa.

While he does bring a corporate bias based on his position at Myriad Genetics Laboratories – and Myriad clearly have a vested interest in selling diagnostic tests – his clinical perspective is worthy of consideration and it’s one that is shared by other GYN oncology thought leaders we have spoken to (see: earlier post, “what Tesaro aren’t telling you about niraparib”).

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Copenhagen – PARP inhibitors are creating quite a lot of controversy here at the 2016 ESMO Congress.

Yesterday, we heard the data for rucaparib (Clovis Oncology) as monotherapy treatment for the advanced ovarian cancer patients with BRCA mutations who have been treated with 2 or more chemotherapies.

In a totally different ovarian cancer indication, today at #ESMO16 we heard the results of the phase 3 trial for niraparib, the PARP inhibitor from Tesaro, that many thought was superior to the rucaparib data, ignoring the fact you can’t make comparisons for maintenance versus relapsed/refractory treatment.

The niraparib ENGOT trial was presented in today’s plenary Presidential Symposium by Dr Mansoor Mirza and simultaneously published in The New England Journal of Medicine (link). It was also featured in a media briefing earlier today in Copenhagen.


In this piece we’ve taken a critical look at the Tesaro (NASDAQ: TSRO) niraparib data and the controversial claim made by their principal investigator, Dr Mirza, that the data shows there is no need for a companion diagnostic to be associated with this drug.

In other words, the intent that regulatory approval will be sought for this drug as maintenance therapy for platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer patients, irrespective of whether they have a BRCA mutation or homologous recombination deficiency (HRD).

This post provides commentary on this and offers the perspective of a leading ovarian cancer expert with deep experience of companion diagnostics in this field.

Subscribers can login to read what Tesaro aren’t saying about the Niraparib data or you can purchase access below…

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