Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Novel Targets Podcast’

Vienna Torte

Which of these cakes will you choose?

Greetings from Vienna where we are gearing up for our coverage of the European Cancer Congress (Twitter #ECC2015).

We’ll be writing a “highlights” post for subscribers at the end of the day here on Saturday, Sunday and Monday, then will follow- up with more in-depth coverage after we have talked with experts about the data presented.

Checkpoint Inhibitors and Cancer Immunotherapy are not surprisingly hot topics at the meeting.

In case you missed it, this month’s episode of Novel Targets (are we really on show #6 already?!) takes us on a new branch of the journey looking at various aspects of cancer immunotherapy:

Boosting T cell production – Stepping on the Gas

In past shows, we’ve looked at unlocking the brakes (checkpoint inhibitors), immune biomarkers (MDSCs and STING pathway), an inflamed or immunologic tumour type (lung cancer), a non-inflamed tumour type (prostate cancer), adoptive cell therapies and now it’s time for something really different… what happens when we literally step on the gas with immune agonists?

That’s the theme of the latest show – listen to Episode 6 on SoundCloud or iTunes (open access thanks to our sponsors, Genentech).

This article focuses on more detailed background and show notes for BSB subscribers.

It’s an important topic that is both simple in concept to understand and yet highly complex in terms of optimising therapy.

It’s time to take a deeper dive…

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With the launch of Episode 4 of the Novel Targets podcast today, I wanted to provide some more detailed background and a roadmap for this part of the journey for subscribers. There’s tremendous wealth of data now building up in several areas related to cancer immunotherapy and both interviewees, Drs Oliver Sartor (Tulane) and James Gulley (NCI), touched on many of them.

Thanks to Tom Gajewski’s exciting work, we can broadly think about different tumour types as inflamed (immunogenic) versus non-inflamed (non-immunogenic), which is a helpful starting point. Not all tumours thought to be responsive to immunotherapy will actually respond though, so we still have much work to do on the 70–80% of patients with solid tumours that don’t respond to these therapies.

Anyone who is interested can listen to the latest Novel Targets podcast.

The latest episode explores non-immunogenic tumours, using prostate cancer as an example. In the last third of the show, we do indeed talk about a promising new target that may have relevance not just to prostate cancer, but other tumour types too.

Listen to Episode 4  (open access thanks to our sponsors, Genentech)

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New Orleans – one of the presentations of note at Immunology 2015 (the annual meeting of the American Association of Immunologists) was by Thomas J. Gajewski MD, PhD from the University of Chicago. His presentation on “Innate immune sensing of cancer via the STING pathway” was well worth the trip to New Orleans.

Presentation by Dr Gajewski at Immunology 2015

Readers may recall the post we wrote in March on “What is STING and why does it matter in cancer immunotherapy?” It followed the news that Novartis were collaborating with Aduro Biotech (NASDAQ: ADRO) on agonists that activate the STING (Stimulator of Interferon Genes) signaling pathway in immune cells.

I had the privilege to talk with Dr Gajewski (pictured below) after his presentation at AAI.

Dr Tom Gajewski AAI 2015

Excerpts from the interview will feature on Episode 2 of the Novel Targets podcast (@TargetsPodcast). (Do sign up for the Novel Targets Newsletter if you want to be among the first to know when this will air). Subscribers can read more from the interview below.

You should read and/or buy access to this post if you don’t know the answers to the following:

  • What role does the tumor microenvironment play in response to cancer immunotherapy?
  • How could the tumor microenvironment be a biomarker of response to checkpoint inhibitors?
  • Why target the STING pathway?
  • Reasons Novartis are collaborating with Aduro Biotech?
  • How may a STING agonist be brought to the clinic?

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