Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Pharma Marketing Strategy’

San Francisco JPM16 Day 2It’s Tuesday at the 2016 JP Morgan Healthcare conference in San Francisco (Twitter #JPM16).

Each day of #JPM16 we’re doing a rolling blog post which we’re updating throughout the day with commentary and insights on the company presentations we’re covering.

While we’re not giving a blow-by-blow account, many companies have the slides readily available, we will be commenting on noteworthy news, and what we learn about corporate strategy going into 2016.

For those of you who like to catch up with the final summary of each day’s highlights, you can read yesterday’s Day 1 synopsis here and our interview with Seattle Genetics CEO, Clay Siegall here.

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San Francisco JPM16 Day 1It’s Day 1 of the annual pilgrimage to San Francisco for the JP Morgan Healthcare conference. In light of the success of the daily rolling blogs we’ve done around the conferences we cover, for the first time we’re doing a rolling blog for each day of #JPM16.

Throughout the day (schedule permitting) we’ll be updating the post with commentary around noteworthy news.

Company presentations mentioned in this post include: $PBYI, $CELG, $GILD, $INCY, $SGEN, $MDVN. There’s also commentary on several of the deals announced by Roche, Juno, Novartis, Sanofi, AstraZeneca & Merck.

If you want to follow along yourself, here’s the link to the JPM16 webcasts & conference agenda.

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Some people may think that if you just give a whole boat load of engineered T cells, and in particular, those modified with a Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR), that responders are “cured.”

While some recipients of engineered T cells can have long-term, durable remissions, others may initially respond, only to subsequently relapse.

Resistance to CAR T cell therapy can and does occur.

In this post, we talked with a leading expert about the latest research on how resistance to cell therapy develops, and the potential strategies to overcome it.

CAR T cell therapy is exciting, but remains an emerging field with multiple ways in which the competitive landscape may be shaped moving forwards.

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A burning question in the field of cancer immunotherapy is how long do you have to give a checkpoint inhibitor for?

At the recent Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) annual meeting, new data presented by one of the leaders in the field, offered insight (from an unexpected direction) into what the answer to this question may be.

It has huge implications for cancer immunotherapy treatment and the many companies involved in this space.

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Marching Band Changing Guard LondonToday marks a year since we put up a paywall on Biotech Strategy Blog. While we were sorry to have to restrict access in this way, our decision reflects what is happening in the wider digital media arena, it’s simply not possible to go to conferences and generate quality content for free!

It was Warren Buffett who said, “Price is what you pay, value is what you get” and that’s how we feel about charging for access to Premium Content on the blog.

When we put a paywall up on the blog last September, many thought it would not last. All those who bet on its early demise are still waiting 😉

What the paywall has done is create an exclusive club that have access to our insights and analysis. Other traditional media organizations are now following suit, by charging a membership fee for premium access.

There is a wealth of free data on the Internet, and lots of media folk do a good job of sharing or curating this, but raw data is not intelligence, nor do they tell you anything about context or meaning. Insights also require knowledge, expertise and thought to generate.

Journalism and digital media are going through a revolution as those who create original content seek to get paid for it. We are part of that vanguard. So this post is a big thank you for all our subscribers from around the world who have supported our initiative.

Our thanks also to Tinypass, who as our technology partner, creates the paywall and administers the payment processing system. We could not have achieved the success we have had without them.

Year in Review:

Looking back at this year, we’ve covered remotely or on site 10 conferences or scientific meetings:

  • ECCO 2013 (Amsterdam)
  • AACR-EORTC-NCI Molecular Targets (Boston)
  • World Lung (Sydney)
  • ASH 2013 (New Orleans)
  • SABCS (San Antonio)
  • JPM 2014 (San Francisco)
  • ASCO GI (San Franciscso)
  • ASCO GU (San Francisco)
  • Miami Breast
  • AACR 2014 (San Diego)
  • AUA 2014 (Orlando)
  • ASCO 2014 (Chicago)

Funding from our subscribers enabled us to attend most of these meetings in person. In addition we’ve followed interesting new stories e.g. by going to Paris to interview the senior management of Cellectis about their CAR-T cell therapy.

By my calculation we’ve written approximately 120 premium content posts of the past year, so the cost per post at the current annual rate is about $10. Those who signed up for special offers got them for even less.

So thanks to everyone who has supported us over the past year, we greatly appreciate you being part of the journey with us. We look forward to welcoming new subscribers over the coming year.

For a limited time only (until end of October) we are offering a special anniversary offer where you can lock in your rate for 2 years. Just click on any post and scroll down to sign up in the box under the post.

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European Hematology Association (EHA) Congress London 2011At the 16th Congress of the European Hematology Association (EHA) that was held in London this past weekend, the educational sessions were extremely well attended.

The reason for this was the quality of the thought leaders who presented on science and emerging treatments.

The quality of the education sessions and the fact they are repeated twice, so you can avoid schedule clashes, is one of the things I particularly like about both the American Society of Hematology (ASH) and European Hematology Association (EHA) annual meetings.

As I have written before while at EAU in Vienna, I’m not a fan of promotional satellite symposia.  As an example on the Thursday before EHA, attendees interested in CML could attend the Novartis symposia in the morning about how nilotinib was better than imatinib, then in the afternoon attend the BMS sponsored symposia to hear how dasatinib was also better than imatinib.  Indeed, two of the speakers were identical in both symposia, but with entirely different messages.

Two other satellite symposia also had speakers talking about second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.  What, of course, was on everyone’s mind was when to use one second-generation TKI over the other?  Also given that imatinib is reimbursed in many countries, while nilotinib and dasatinib are often not yet available in that setting, the issue of how to treat patients second-line with these therapies was also a hot topic.

However, just attending the individual company-sponsored symposia, to me, meant that it was hard to put together a big picture of exactly what to do when.  Perhaps a better way to handle it would have been to have one CML satellite symposia sponsored by all the companies with a dog in the race (Novartis, BMS, Ariad, Pfizer). We might have heard what the experts really thought that way. 🙂

The other issue that arose during the meeting is how data is presented when looking strategically at one treatment or trial to another in the same indication.  Are you truly comparing apples with oranges?

M Baccarani European Hematology Association Congress London 2011As Professor Michele Baccarani pointed out, there is a big difference between data that shows a cytogenetic or molecular response “BY” a certain time as compared to “AT” a certain time.

“BY” can include patients who had a response then went in remission, so could present a higher number than “AT” data that shows only those patients who have a response at that cut-off date.  This is an important distinction, for example, when comparing data from the BMS DASISION trial and Novartis ENESTnd trials to long-term survival data for imatinib versus interferon-alpha from the IRIS trial.

So, it was left to the EHA education symposia to provide some practical guidance.  In an excellent presentation, Hagop Kantarjian M.D. from MD Anderson provocatively presented his CML treatment guidelines, and discussed when you would use one drug over the other along with the importance of routine monitoring to evaluate how well a patient was doing on therapy.

Webcasts from the EHA education sessions will be available online soon and are well worth watching if you were unable to be in London this past weekend.

 

The findings from a telephone survey of 3001 adults show that social media and the internet are increasingly important for finding health information.

This has important implications for the marketing professionals in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries who struggle to come to grips with social media in the absence of any FDA guidance.

The Pew Internet & American Life Project published today their survey on “The Social Life of Health Information, 2011.”  It makes for interesting reading.  Some of the statistics I found of interest, relating to the United States, include:

  • 74% of adults use the internet
  • 59% of adults (80% of internet users) have looked for online health information around a disease or major health topic
  • 25% of adults (34% of internet users) have read someone else’s commentary or experience about a health issue on an online news group, website or blog
  • 19% of adults (25% of internet users) have watched an online video about health or medical topics (See my previous post on using social media such as video to recruit for clinical trials)
  • 13% of adults (18% of internet users) have consulted online reviews of particular drugs or medical treatments

As this insightful report notes, “people use online social tools to gather information, share stories, and discuss concerns.”

Pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies will have to come to terms with addressing the increasing desire of patients for information, presented in a way that is fair balanced and non-promotional.

The power of social media to potentially change the paradigm of how medical data is gathered was also highlighted in the recent paper published in Nature Biotechnology.

This paper presented an analysis of data collected on the website PatientsLikeMe for those suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).  While such data will never replace a randomized, blinded drug study, I think that patient community data could have a role to play in areas around Quality of Life (QoL) assessments and post-marketing surveillance.

Increased fast internet access is driving social media and the demand for quality health information.  This trend is only set to continue.

ResearchBlogging.orgWicks, P., Vaughan, T., Massagli, M., & Heywood, J. (2011). Accelerated clinical discovery using self-reported patient data collected online and a patient-matching algorithm Nature Biotechnology, 29 (5), 411-414 DOI: 10.1038/nbt.1837

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