Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Prof Waseem Qasim’

Prof Qasim ASH 2015 posterPart 2 of the ASH 2015 interview Professor Waseem Qasim kindly gave BSB at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) discusses the poster he presented at the meeting (Abstract 2046:) “First Clinical Application of Talen Engineered Universal CAR19 T Cells in B-ALL.”

Prof Qasim is a Consultant in Paediatric Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplantation at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and Professor of Cell & Gene Therapy at the Institute of Child Health which is part of University College London (UCL).

The “devil is in the detail” so it was a privilege to be taken through the case by Prof Qasim, and in the process, better understand the treatment rational, as well some of the challenges and unanswered questions that will need to be addressed moving forwards.

The first-in-man use of the UCART19 allogeneic CAR T cell therapy from Cellectis was done under the Compassionate Use guidelines of the UK Medicines and Health Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). A phase 1 clinical trial is planned for early 2016.

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Prof Qasim UCART19 ASH 2015 PosterMy highlight of the 2015 annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) was interviewing Professor Waseem Qasim, who is a Consultant in Paediatric Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplantation at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and Professor of Cell & Gene Therapy at the Institute of Child Health, which is part of University College London (UCL).

In a poster presented at ASH 2015, Prof Qasim together with colleagues from GOSH & UCL reported the “first in man” use of a gene edited, off-the-shelf, allogeneic CAR T cell from Cellectis, a company we have written extensively about on the blog. It was probably one of the leading posters at the meeting, at least in terms of the amount of interest it generated, and the crowds I saw reading it.

There was far too much content in the interview for one blog post, so we’ve split into two, with Part 1 focusing on gene editing and Part 2 discussing in detail the case reported in the poster.

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