Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘SIRP-alpha’

As we move from monotherapies to combinations in the immuno-oncology space, we start to see some intriguing ideas being explored from additional checkpoints to vaccines to neoantigens to immune agonists to oncolytic viruses. There are numerous ways to evaluate how to boost or jumpstart more immune cells upfront in the hope of seeing better efficacy.

One way to do this is to better understand the tumour microenvironment.

Wall of people at ASH16 in San Diego

If we know what’s wrong under the hood, we might be better able to make the immune system get going… more gas, faulty starter motor, dead battery, loose wire, broken fan belt? All these things and more might be a problem so you can see that diagnosing the issue up from from basic and translational work might be instructive for clinical trials.

If you don’t know what problem you’re trying to fix or repair then you might as well be throwing mud at the wall. Just as we don’t expect a car mechanic to suggest changing the battery or starter-motor without first diagnosing the issue, so understanding the tumour microenvironment in each different cancer or disease might also be a helpful strategy.

At the recent American Society of Hematology annual meeting (#ASH16), there was a fascinating sceintifc workshop that focused on this very concept – what’s going on under the hood and how do we go about fixing it?

Here we explore these ideas via an interview with a thought leader and specialist in the field. What he had to say was very interesting and candid indeed.

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In the past, I’ve sometimes been accused of being a bit of an immunotherapy bear for my dislike of cancer vaccines as a single agent therapy in advanced disease where the tumour burden is very high. That particular field has undoubtedly been a huge graveyard for many companies, much in the same way that metastatic melanoma was, until novel therapeutics and immunotherapeutics emerged to push through the envelope.

To be clear, I am though, a big fan of targeted immunotherapies such as checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which have been very much to the forefront in immuno-oncology over the last two years and rightly so, with some initial trials showing some very promising results.

Both of those approaches are squarely part of the adaptive immune system and seek, in different ways, to retrain the bodies immune system to fight the tumour. More recently, the innate immune system has seen new advances as reearchers moved beyond simple vaccines to develop more thoughtful and innovative approaches that seek to outwit the very masking the cancer is trying to fool the immune system with. It’s no less exciting, just a different way of looking at the science and improving out understanding of the biology of the many diseases that cancer makes up.

In this AACR preview, I take a broad look at some innovative and novel scientific approaches, including targeting anti-CD47 and SIRPα (Stanford and Stem Cell Therapeutics), KIR and MICA (Innate Pharma) and neutrophils (Biothera).

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