Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘SITC 2014 Immuno-Oncology’

At the recent 2014 annual meeting of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), it was surprising to see how many people stayed till the bitter end of the conference to attend the Hot Topic Symposium on Accelerating Tumor Immunity with Agonist Antibodies.

Readers are well aware of the potential of cancer immunotherapies that block immune checkpoint receptors. After all, the FDA has already approved antibodies that block CTLA–4 (ipiliimumab) and PD–1 (pembrolizumab) in metastatic melanoma, with nivolumab (Opdivo) currently being reviewed for advanced melanoma and lung cancers.

These antagonists, and others in development targeting the PD-L1 signalling pathway, such as MEDI4736 and MPDL3280A, act to reduce the engagement of inhibitory receptors on the T-cell. This results in a releasing of a brake on the T cell response, enabling killer T cells to attack the tumour(s).

CD40 in cancer Source: Costello et al., 1999

However, in order to stimulate an immune response, particularly in tumors with few natural T cells, it is likely that agonist antibodies will be required that act on stimulatory signalling receptors on T cells and antigen presenting cells (APC’s).

In a previous post from SITC, we discussed the potential of agonists targeting OX40, and the rational for combining an anti-OX40 antibody with an anti-PDL1. This is one of the hottest targets that thought leaders are excited about from our discussions.

It isn’t the only one of interest though. Another potential stimulatory target that might be suitable for combination with anti-PD–1/PD-L1 is an antibody against CD40 (not to be confused with OX40). The pathway (shown right) is quite complex.

Subscribers can login to read more about another fascinating talk from SITC 2014 on where the cancer immunotherapy may be heading.

ESMO 2014 Bladder CancerCancer immunotherapy, the ability to harness the body’s own immune system to fight cancer, is showing early promise in bladder cancer.

“Breathing new life into bladder cancer treatment” was the title of the excellent discussion by Maria De Dantis (Vienna) of data presented at the recent ESMO Congress in Madrid.

Advanced bladder cancer has a particularly poor prognosis. Once the cancer has spread in the body, according to Cancer Research UK, the average survival time is approximately a year to 18 months.

There is clearly an unmet medical need for effective new treatments, with no major treatment advances for over 30 years. To date, targeted agents in the second-line setting have shown only incremental progression free survival and generally low overall response rates.

Which is why it’s exciting to see hope for patients with urothelial bladder cancer from new inhibitors of the PD-1 immune checkpoint signalling pathway.

At ASCO this year, data for Roche/Genentech’s anti PD-L1 (MPDL3280A) was presented (Abstract 5011) by Thomas Powles (Barts, London). Commenting on the data, in her post “Making a difference in advanced bladder cancer” Sally noted, “it wouldn’t have been out of place in the Plenary session, frankly.”

Recognizing the potential based on the promise of the early clinical data, on May 31st the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation (BTD) to MPDL3280A in bladder cancer.

ESMO 2014 Bladder Cancer Session ChairsIf you need to catch up on immuno-oncology, we have a growing library of posts on Biotech Strategy Blog, and we’ll be continuing our coverage of the rapid progress in this area at the forthcoming annual meeting of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), which takes place at National Harbor, MD from Nov 6 -9.

At ESMO 2014, phase 1 clinical trial data in bladder cancer was presented for both Pembrolizumab (Merck) and MPDL3280A (Roche/Genentech).

Subscribers can login in to read how the two drugs compared in this indication, or you can purchase access by clicking on the blue icon below.

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