Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Adoptive cell therapy’

This is the penultimate post in our mini-series looking at the potential of immunometabolism for cancer new product development. The initial plans for six posts ended up being revised with a seventh and final article based on an additional thought leader interview.

What’s the immunometabolism prize?

Like a series of postcards from our travels, the aim was to offer a flavor of different approaches in the field, some of which are already being translated and evaluated by biotech companies in clinical trials.

Along the way, like conversations on a journey, we spoke to several scientists working at the forefront of this research. As regular readers know we don’t just interview the ‘great and good’ – the established PI’s but in this series – we also spoke to some emerging up and coming researchers too. Each offered a unique personal perspective on different aspects of metabolism and its potential role in cancer research.

In today’s post, we share an interview with a young researcher working on a novel and intriguing approach, which could improve adoptive cell therapy.

We expect to hear a lot more about many of the immunometabolic strategies we’ve highlighted over the course of coming months, so this is a theme we will return to as new data emerges.

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In the fourth part of our mini-series in novel targets and agents in development we turn to novel cell therapy approaches that are perhaps under the radar for many observers.

While these might seem bleak times during a pandemic, there’s always a silver lining somewhere

While much attention has been focused on antigen loss or downregulation of the target wih adoptive cell therapies, research continues to evaluate various solutions to the problem.

One obvious way is to develop dual CARs or target multiple antigen targets of relevance to the tumour type being investigated.

There are other potential solutions being looked at, both in preclinical animal models and in translational work using cells from people treated with HSCT or CAR T cell therapies.

Here, we look at an alternative immunotherapy approach, which with time may have utility in both hematologic malignancies, as well as solid tumours…

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For the final post in our mini series on the potential of gamma delta (γδ) T cells for cancer immunotherapy, we’re traveling to Scotland with a visit to a company that is a poster child for Scottish enterprise.

TC BioPharm Office Building

TC (as in T cell) BioPharm are leading the way in development of allogeneic γδ T cell therapies. They’ve already completed a trial of autologous γδ T cell therapy to establish safety and now have an allogeneic phase 1 trial underway in Prague.

TC BioPharm logoCEO and Founder, Dr Michael Leek, has built a company that already counts bluebird bio (NASDAQ: $BLUE) as one its partners (Link).

Co-Founder and Chief Operating Officer, Dr Angela Scott was part of the team that cloned the first mammal, “Dolly the Sheep.”

Angela Scott COO and Co-Founder of TC BioPharm

Dr Angela Scott, COO

She was recently profiled in The Herald (Link) and her cell therapy experience has been instrumental in the development of the company’s own GMP manufacturing facility in Scotland.

As the Herald article notes, the company is being positioned for a possible NASDAQ IPO in 2020, so is definitely one to watch out for.

We all remember catchy advertising slogans, and one I remember well is for the now defunct Orange mobile phone network in the UK: “The future is bright, the future is orange.”

If you’re TC BioPharm then maybe this could be construed as: “The future is bright, the future is allogeneic” (γδ T cells).

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King Kamehameha Statue Honolulu HI

King Kamehameha Statue, Honolulu HI

Honolulu: we’re continuing our coverage of the 2016 BMT Tandem meeting with a thought leader interview about a novel cancer immunotherapy approach that we’re excited about.

The cancer cell therapy landscape is still vastly uncharted territory in many respects.

The first CD19 targeted CAR T cell therapies expected to reach the market in 2017 are unlikely to be best-in-class, which leaves the commercial door open for other approaches that may be better, cheaper or more accessible.

If you are in the CAR T cell therapy space, there are plenty of competitive threats on the horizon, and the novel approach discussed in this post is one of them!

We’d heard a little about it, but hadn’t explored the concept in any detail, so were delighted to talk with a leading expert at the BMT Tandem meeting in Honolulu.

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At the recent American Association of Immunology (AAI) and American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy (ASGCT) meetings in New Orleans, we had the good fortune to interview a number of leading cancer immunologists about their work. Some of these have already been published either here on Biotech Strategy Blog, or on the Novel Targets podcast.

In the meantime, the huge tsunami of data from the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) hit and we have been a bit backlogged! Time to address that and focus on some more thoughtful reflections about where the cancer immunotherapy field is going.

Already, we are seeing another round of new collaborations and deals hit the newswires with AstraZeneca announcing two collaborations, one with Inovio on the INO–3112 HPV cancer vaccine and another with Heptares, where they acquired the exclusive global rights to develop, manufacture and commercialise the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, HTL–1071. The first involves a cancer vaccine and the second immune escape mechanisms.  Not to be outdone, their rivals Clovis also announced a collaboration with Genentech to explore rociletinib (EGFR T790M) with atezoliumab (anti-PD-L1) in EGFR mutation-positive lung cancer.

Cancer vaccines have not, however, been a very successful or fertile area of R&D for Pharmaland to date, with only one such therapy approved by the FDA (sipuleucel-T or Provenge) and literally hundreds of other such compounds consigned to dog drug heaven. This illustrates the sheer enormity of the task we need to undertake in stimulating the body’s immune system to successfully attack the cancer in a sustained and robust way.

Dr Rosenberg, NCI

Dr Rosenberg, NCI

Despite this setback, there is still notable interest in exploring the innate immune system and finding effective ways to target and stimulate the T cells or T lymphocytes to attack the cancer.

One man who has accomplished an incredible body of work over the last two to three decades is Dr Steven Rosenberg from the NCI’s Surgery Branch (right).

No one who attended any of the cancer conferences where he spoke at over the last year is ever going to forget the dramatic before and after slides of remarkable transformation in his patient case history examples using Tumour Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs) as this example illustrates:

 

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