Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘eisai’

With the annual meeting of Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) fast approaching this week, it’s time for a look at some of the final highlights to watch out for.

National Harbor from Gaylord HotelIn this latest conference preview, we have chosen a dozen key topics of interest that readers may find worth checking out plus an honourable mention for early compounds in development that we may well hear more about going forward.

Some of the early warning signs were offered up in the earlier Previews and with the abstracts now available, things are getting very interesting indeed…

How are things panning out so far with the abstract drop and are the new products in development living up to the hype and expectations?

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ASH16 in San Diego

Today we resume our coverage from the recent American Society of Hematology (ASH16) annual meeting with a look at some fascinating and highly compelling science that was presented in an obscure and hard to find tiny hall in San Diego.

This story is also about how a small biotech company that many casual observers may not even be aware of, is taking advantage of advances recent research to grab a clinical lead in a very specialised field in oncology that may yield a novel approach worthy of taking notice of..

Genomics is increasingly becoming a core element of cancer research. Think of it as the alphabet soup of molecular biology concerned with the structure, function, evolution, and mapping of genomes.

Once we understand and identify the genomic landscape in health and diseases such as cancer, it allows numerous platforms to evolve whereby those unique differences can be identified (as driver vs. passenger mutations, for example), explored in depth, and later key ones targeted with therapeutics. Inevitably, there are many ways to do this.

Much of the focus in genomics has been on DNA, but what about RNA?

RNA is important because a mistake – even a single nucleotide – can be devastating to the cell, and a reliable, repeatable method of RNA processing is necessary to ensure cell survival. Mis-splicing can thus lead to the development of new point mutations and genomic instability deep in the cell nucleus, potentially causing the evolution of certain cancers.

Paradoxically, these aberrations also offer novel therapeutic targets – but are they druggable?

What we are exploring here is a completely different approach, both in terms of how a fledgling company is funded and also the type of research that is conducted.

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