A short, but quite important, post today highlighting an early target we are keen to follow in terms of combination trials in both GI and GU cancers, as well as others.

There’s been a lot of focus this year on the so-called inflamed (hot) and non-inflamed (cold) tumours, but what about the intermediate ones that many refer to as the immune excluded phenotype?

View of Geneva from Cathedral St Pierre, Switzerland

Clearly it makes sense to consider different combination approaches in each category, but what would be appropriate? Before we can set about doing that, we first have to uncover the mechanisms causing the inhibition on the tumour microenvironment and then figure out how best to identify those patients most likely to benefit.

Over the last couple of years, we’ve seen and written a lot about various potential candidates (not all will be useful), including myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), regulatory T cells (Tregs), tumour associated macrophages (TAMs), chemokines, cytokines, adenosine fog and many others.

There is one target that has started gathering a little bit steam over the last year that we have mentioned a couple of times on BSB and now there is something new to discuss here, at least from a big picture perspective.

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