Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘New Prostate Cancer Drugs’

2012 Annual meeting of American Association for Cancer Research in Chicago. Photo Credit: Pieter DroppertAs Sally Church, PhD noted on Pharma Strategy Blog, the 2012 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), recently held in Chicago, showcased many new cancer products in early development.

Cancer new products have a high attrition rate as they move through the development pipeline, so any promising results seen in early stages of development must be viewed with caution.

Results from laboratory studies using cell lines or trials in animals do not always translate into new drugs that work in man, e.g. they may have an unacceptable toxicity, not target the driver mutation, or adaptive resistance may just lead to the cancer bypassing the blocked pathway.

However, scientific meetings such as AACR do provide a window into the possible new drugs of the future. One prostate cancer new product that caught my attention at AACR 2012 as one to watch is AZD3514.

Sarah Loddick from AstraZeneca gave one of the few oral presentations at AACR on this exciting new compound.  This was the only AACR session I attended where I was able to access wifi. Some of my live-tweets are captured in the Storify below (click here to access this on Storify):

http://storify.com/3nt/aacr-2012-azd3514-in-prostate-cancer

Unfortunately, Sarah Loddick has not (as of time of writing) shared a copy of the AZD3514 prostate cancer poster that she presented later in the meeting, so I’m unable to write more about the preclinical prostate cancer data.

AZD3514 is a novel selective androgen receptor down-regulator (SARD) and has a different mechanism of action to drugs such as enzalutamide (MDV3100) that functionally inhibit AR signaling by binding to the AR & AR splice variants.

Sarah Loddick concluded at the end of her oral presentation that AZD3514:

  • inhibits prostate cancer growth in vitro & in vivo
  • has activity against wild-type and mutated AR
  • has activity in pre-clinical models that represent castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)
  • inhibits seminal vesicle growth in rats in the presence of physiological levels of circulating tumor cells.

AZD3514 is in a multi-center phase 1 clinical trial in patients with metastatic CRPC in Europe (NCT01162395) and Japan (NCT01351688). I look forward to seeing the presentation of the results from these trials.

From what I saw at AACR, AZD3514 is a new prostate cancer drug to watch.

Update April 20, 2012

I was delighted to receive an email this morning from Sarah Loddick of AstraZeneca with a copy of the AZD3514 poster that I requested (AACR abstract #3848): “Pre-clinical profile of AZD3514: a small molecule targeting androgen receptor function with a novel mechanism of action and the potential to treat castration resistant prostate cancer.

I am sensitive to the unpublished status of much of the research presented at AACR, but without giving too much away, some of the key messages from this poster are that AZD3514:

  • Binds to the androgen receptor (AR) ligand binding domain & reduces viability of prostate cancer cells in vitro. 
  • Inhibits AR transcriptional activity within 2h of exposure in LNCaP cells, and reduced both PSA & TMPRSS2 mRNA
  • Inhibits AR induced translocation to the nucleus
  • Causes AR down-regulation in prostate cells in vitro
  • Causes AR down-regulation in rat R3327H prostate tumors
  • Has activity in pre-clinical models of CRPC

A drug such as AZD3514 in prostate cancer could potentially be used to overcome resistance to enzalutamide (MDV3100), or alternatively it could be used ahead of enzalutamide if it has the potential to avoid resistance and offer better outcomes. We obviously will have to wait for clinical data to see what it’s true potential is and the data from AACR, while promising, is still only preclinical.

The prostate cancer market is a busy one and companies with AR targeted new products in development will have to offer drugs that are superior to enzalutamide if they wish to have lasting commercial success.

Update June 6, 2013: AstraZeneca terminates development of AZD3514 in Advanced Prostate Cancer

At ASCO 2013 it was announced that the development of AZD3514 in advanced prostate cancer has been terminated. You can read more about what happened in the first-in-human clinical trial in my AZD3514 blog post from ASCO 2013.

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Maha Hussain MB ChB is Professor of Medical Oncology at the University of Michigan.  She is an international expert into genitourinary malignancies with a focus on clinical research into prostate and bladder cancer.

Cabozantinib is a new drug in development by Exelixis for multiple indications.  It captured a lot of attention at the ASCO 2011 annual meeting last year, when Dr Hussain presented data from a phase 2 prostate cancer trial that showed a dramatic improvement in bone scans and pain reduction in those men receiving it.

Unlike other new prostate cancer drugs such as abiraterone (Zytiga) or MDV3100 that target the androgen receptor, cabozantinib is a multi-kinase inhibitor of MET and VEGFR.  It has both an anti-tumor effect and an effect on bone metabolism.

At the AACR Advances in Prostate Cancer Research conference last month, chaired by Charles Sawyers (MSKCC) and Arul Chinnayan (Michigan), Dr Hussain gave a presentation on “Cabozantinib (XL-184) and prostate cancer: preclinical and clinical profile of a novel agent.”

I was privileged to have the opportunity to interview Dr Hussain by phone recently and obtain her insight into cabozantinib as a potential new treatment for prostate cancer.

We covered a lot of ground, too much for one blog post, so I’ve broken down the interview into segments that I will be posting separately.

Cabozantinib & Pain

As many readers will be aware, one of the dramatic results presented at ASCO last year, was the impact that cabozantinib had on pain.

AACR-Molecular-Targets-2011-Cabozantinib-Pain-DataAt the AACR Molecular Targets meeting in San Francisco last November, further pain data was presented by Howard Scher’s group at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. They showed in a non-randomized phase 2 trial that:

Cabozantinib treatment resulted in high rates of pain improvement and analgesic reduction or discontinuation in patients with moderate to severe pain at baseline

–  Rapid and durable pain relief

–  Pain relief observed regardless of prior lines of therapy

–  Improvement in pain accompanied by reduced interference with sleep and daily activity

Exelixis has since moved forward with clinical trials focusing on prostate cancer pain.

Pain response is the primary outcome in the phase III trial (COMET-2) of cabozantinib (XL184) Versus Mitoxantrone Plus Prednisone in Men With Previously Treated Symptomatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer (COMET-2 trial formerly known as XL184-306). Overall survival is a secondary endpoint.

The challenge with using pain as a primary endpoint is that all the advanced prostate cancer drugs that have recently been approved by the FDA such as cabazitaxel (Jevtana), abiraterone (Zytiga), and those for whom approval is expected, such as MDV3100 and radium-223 (Alpharadin), have all shown an improvement in overall survival.

I was, therefore, interested to hear Dr Hussain’s perspective on cabozantinib and its effect on pain in prostate cancer.

BSB: Can pain be a surrogate for survival that regulatory agencies might accept?

Dr Hussain: Honestly, I am not the expert on what the regulatory agencies will do. I know what they have done and I would say that pain has been an indication for regulatory approval of prostate cancer. That’s a long story, it’s an old story. Mitoxantrone was approved based on pain, so I don’t think that is going to be an issue.

Whether it is a surrogate for survival remains to be seen, and to be honest with you, I think that it may not be if you are really using it in far advanced cancer. As we have seen with mitoxantrone, it didn’t seem to make an impact on survival and it is really more about disease progression and pain and quality of life type issues. 

I am not aware of a trial that has been done with a primary endpoint being pain, and another key primary endpoint or a secondary endpoint being survival, that has been positive.  Having said that, I think in my view, it is a mistake to just focus on the pain. 

Pain, as far as I can tell from our experience and others, it’s very late in the setting of the disease by a nowadays standard. I would argue that using this drug as a pain only type drug, you could do it cheaper and less toxic with other agents, with morphine for example. 

My point here is, I go back and say to focus it on pain only, my average patient is interested in living longer, not just in controlling their pain. 

You can hear more about this in the SoundCloud audio clip below.  Prostate cancer patients are not just interested in “how will this drug make me feel,” but also “will I live longer?”  Click here if you can’t see the audio file.

Dr Hussain: My point is in a perfect world if the drug delivers, the importance is going to be a totality of effect, that is prolonging life and improving quality of life overall.

BSB: Thank you

The next installment of the Biotech Strategy Blog interview with Dr Hussain will focus on the clinical significance of the dramatic bone scans seen with cabozantinib.

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View-of-Paris-from-European-Association-of-Urology-2012-CongressToday sees the start of the 27th annual European Association of Urology (EAU) Congress at the Palais des Congrès in Paris.

The meeting runs from 24-28 February, 2012. Over 10,000 delegates are expected, and more than 1193 abstracts have been accepted for poster and video sessions.

In addition to a scientific programme, this meeting also has a strong educational component with numerous courses through the European School of Urology (ESU) and hands-on-training to improve surgical skills in cooperation with the EAU Section of Uro-Technology (ESUT), the EAU Section of Urolithiasis (EULIS) and the EAU Section of Robotic Urology (ERUS).

If you can’t be in Paris, then EAU have some live webcasts and they will be sharing a lot of the content from the meeting as well as undertaking video interviews.  Check out the EAU 2012 Paris Congress website for more information.

For those that are interested in following the twitter coverage of the meeting, the hashtag is #EAU12, and EAU is @uroweb on twitter.  You can also use the twitter aggregator below:

 

I will be flying to Stockholm next week for the European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress (twitter #EMCC2011), more commonly known as ECCO or ESMO 2011.

What are the sessions that look interesting at the meeting? I previously wrote about the phase III ALSYMPCA trial data for Alpharadin that will be presented as a late breaking abstract.

In addition, the best abstract at ECCO 2011 is on vismodegib in basal cell carcinoma.  Sally Church on Pharma Strategy Blog has written extensively about the hedgehog pathway and role of smoothend inhibition in the treatment of cancer.

What else has attracted my attention at ECCO 2011 in Stockholm? In looking at the preliminary program I was struck by the large number of scientific symposia throughout the meeting. However, many occur at the same time! On Saturday 24th two in particular caught my attention:

Molecular Imaging of Hypoxia

Nanotechnologies for Targeted Drug Delivery

Having written about hypoxia and nanotechnology on this blog, I will probably go to one of those two sessions.

Later in the conference, there is another block of scientific symposia on Monday 26th, again all at the same time! Several that look particularly interesting include:

  • How to understand and to Reverse Drug Resistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer
  • From New Targets to New Drugs in Prostate Cancer
  • Tailoring Personalized Medicine for the Future
  • The Role of IGFs/IGF-1R Pathway in Paediatric Malignancies

And in case one still hasn’t had enough science, there’s another group of scientific symposia on the final day of the conference on Tuesday, 27 September including:

  • Unravelling Ras PI3 Kinases Targets 
  • PARP inhibiting strategies: from Molecular Mechanisms to Rational Clinical Applications

I expect Stockholm to be expensive, they jokingly say you can buy a brewery in America for the price of a beer in the city, but it looks like there’ll be some interesting news and scientific data from the meeting. Hopefully I’ll have a few hours sometime to see something of what looks like a stunningly beautiful city.

If you plan to be in Stockholm do let me know. I can be reached via twitter (@3NT).

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