Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘PSMA’

Continuing our ASCO20 coverage with another Preview in the pre-meeting series, we turn our attention to a particular modality of keen interest to many of our readers.

In this latest article, we highlight ten areas within the niche and include an array of companies, both big and small, across Pharma and Biotechs.

Some of them have some nice data to share, others will be footnotes to the meeting, but who fits into what category and what can we learn from the abstracts upfront?

To find out more, we looked very carefully at the hints and nuance which inevitably grace the writer’s pen – it’s time to hone in on where are the flourishes and the crossings out this year?

To learn more from our oncology analysis and get a heads up on insights and commentary emerging from the ASCO meeting, subscribers can log-in or you can click to gain access to BSB Premium Content.

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A saying for the ages from Albert Einstein

Oncology R&D is – perhaps surprisingly – very much like the bicycle analogy Albert Einstein described.

There are many ways we can see this happening at meetings such as AACR and ASCO as companies struggle to finesse the therapeutic window and balance efficacy with toxicity, for example.

Or how about finding creative ways to extend and broaden a particular drug class?

Another approach might be to take an entirely different angle to tackling a tumour type by targeting an antigen few others are pursuing. Just because the herd is going in one direction doesn’t mean you should follow them down the same path as well.

Then there’s switching modalities, orthosteric versus allosteric inhibitors, or how about some med chem magic where researchers seek to enhance the good properties and minimise the weaknesses while still hitting a target selectively?

All of these methods require some kind of balancing act if you want your pipeline to move forward rather remain still or fall over in the doldrums.

Today’s post has all of this and more – there are some novel compounds and targets, emerging biotechs and big pharmas, as well as innovative thinking to make a difference. Several of these agents are first-in-class, which means the rest of us can learn much from the lessons they have shared.

What’s not to like?

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Continuing our up and coming biotech series, we now switch our focus from small molecules to immuno-oncology.

While big Pharma has garnered the lion’s share of attention (and revenues) from checkpoint inhibitors and CAR-T cell therapies, if we want to make a serious impact on solid tumours, especially the colder ones, then we are going to need to devise ways of jumpstarting the immune system where there are far fewer immune cells around to help do this.

There are many ways to achieve this aim, although the count is still out on how best to optimise combinations.

We’ve looked at various approaches over the last couple of years including chemotherapy, immune agonists, cytokines, STING/PARP/TLRs, NK cell checkpoints, T and NK cell bispecifics, and many many more.

Fortunately, most small biotechs have been focused on alternative targets that mght be seen as complementary to existing established therapeutics.

As we move forward towards a more regimen-based approach some of these will succeed while many will not, such are the challenges of oncology R&D where 90% of compounds unfortunately fail.

One challenge that has long been obvious though is that once clinical proof of concept has been established, another 10 companies will wade in quickly and dust down old molecules lurking in screening libraries that have been languishing in darkness waiting for their call-up. In the old days, a lead time of 5+ years before a competitor caught up with a rival drug was not uncommon.

Increasingly, it now seems there are mere months rather than years between approvals in the same class, an astonishing feat in a highly competitive and cut-throat business driven by generic erosion, noticeable pipeline gaps and the urgent need for continued topline sales growth.

In today’s hot seat, we have a small biotech CEO discussing his company’s IO pipeline and progress…. they caught my attention at AACR last year and I’m delighted to have the opportunity to learn more about what they are doing and how they are different from the existing competition.

To learn more from our latest biotech CEO interview and get a heads up on our oncology insights, subscribers can log-in or you can click to gain access to BSB Premium Content.

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