Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘T cell bispecifics’

Breathing fire into cancer immunotherapies with novel approaches

It would be all to easy an exercise to pick out our top 10 abstracts of any particular conference and share them, which tends to create a somewhat skewed perspective because there are often many pieces of research that we may wish to highlight for entirely different reasons, making the exercise rather limited in scope.

Instead, how about 10 cool or next generation approaches that could have an impact in oncology in the future?

This approach generated a quite different and really eclectic list that can also have existing approaches referenced in context, so that we can see where the puck is moving towards as opposed to merely following it.

Curious to find out more about these novel ideas or iterations and get a heads up on insights from our ASH19 commentary?Subscribers can log-in or you can click to gain access to BSB Premium Content.

This content is restricted to subscribers

River Rhine, Mainz

Mainz, Germany: We’re back for Day 2 highlights from the 2019 Association for Cancer Immunotherapy (CIMT) annual meeting with a look at some insights emerging from some academic and industry talks, as well as gems emerging from the poster halls.

Much attention is focused on cancer immunotherapy clinical data, yet it’s also important to watch out for new developments.

These can take many different forms such as what are companies doing to meet those challenges with novel therapeutics, as well as understanding more detail about immune mechanisms, including evasion and escape as well as defining phenotypes based on different immune cell populations.

As we head into ASCO, let’s not forget that there’s some important learnings to be had elsewhere in the world before we get there…

To learn more from our latest conference coverage and oncology insights, subscribers can log-in or you can click to gain access to BSB Premium Content.

This content is restricted to subscribers

Gaudi’s Casa Milà/La Pedrera, Barcelona

Barcelona: There’s a lot of choice when it comes to cancer immunotherapy conferences, but an event that caught our attention this year as one that merited coverage is the European Association for Cancer Research (EACR) meeting, Defense is the Best Attack – Immuno-Oncology Breakthroughs taking place in Barcelona this week.

The conference is being held in the basement of La Pedrera, Gaudi’s famous Casa Milà modernist building in Barcelona (right).

It’s such an old building that you’re actually forbidden to plug in any phones or computers to charge them for fear of over-loading the electrics, so it’s an event that requires you to be fully charged upfront!

What were some of the highlights from Day 1?  There were some key data and concepts being presented that will grab folks involved in cancer research…

To learn more from our latest conference coverage and oncology insights, subscribers can log-in or you can click to gain access to BSB Premium Content.

This content is restricted to subscribers

Continuing our up and coming biotech series, we now switch our focus from small molecules to immuno-oncology.

While big Pharma has garnered the lion’s share of attention (and revenues) from checkpoint inhibitors and CAR-T cell therapies, if we want to make a serious impact on solid tumours, especially the colder ones, then we are going to need to devise ways of jumpstarting the immune system where there are far fewer immune cells around to help do this.

There are many ways to achieve this aim, although the count is still out on how best to optimise combinations.

We’ve looked at various approaches over the last couple of years including chemotherapy, immune agonists, cytokines, STING/PARP/TLRs, NK cell checkpoints, T and NK cell bispecifics, and many many more.

Fortunately, most small biotechs have been focused on alternative targets that mght be seen as complementary to existing established therapeutics.

As we move forward towards a more regimen-based approach some of these will succeed while many will not, such are the challenges of oncology R&D where 90% of compounds unfortunately fail.

One challenge that has long been obvious though is that once clinical proof of concept has been established, another 10 companies will wade in quickly and dust down old molecules lurking in screening libraries that have been languishing in darkness waiting for their call-up. In the old days, a lead time of 5+ years before a competitor caught up with a rival drug was not uncommon.

Increasingly, it now seems there are mere months rather than years between approvals in the same class, an astonishing feat in a highly competitive and cut-throat business driven by generic erosion, noticeable pipeline gaps and the urgent need for continued topline sales growth.

In today’s hot seat, we have a small biotech CEO discussing his company’s IO pipeline and progress…. they caught my attention at AACR last year and I’m delighted to have the opportunity to learn more about what they are doing and how they are different from the existing competition.

To learn more from our latest biotech CEO interview and get a heads up on our oncology insights, subscribers can log-in or you can click to gain access to BSB Premium Content.

This content is restricted to subscribers

Here we are with Part 2 of our latest mini-series on novel ways to jumpstart the immune system so that subsequent therapy can be more effective, leading to improved outcomes.

In Part 1, we looked at the preclinical and scientific evidence regarding a novel approach to modulate a cold or non-inflamed tumour type, thereby turning the phenotype into a hotter or inflamed one.

In principle, this concept sounds quite simple in theory, but in practice it’s actually much more technically challenging to do than many realise, especially when we consider not just the design of the antibody itself and perhaps even efficacy, but also the convenience of administration and tolerability, both as monotherapy and also in combination with other therapies.

What’s up on deck today is not one, but three interviews, offering readers a candid look through the keyhole at varied insights from different perspectives around a central R&D topic, namely…

What do you do when you have a new compound in clinical development and wish to explore how to integrate it – do you use it with an existing framework or try something new and different? What about other compounds that might be competing with it internally?

It’s a question every single oncology company faces when a new molecule moves out of preclinical development into phase 1 trials. What next?

To learn more insights on this intriguing topic, subscribers can log-in or you can purchase access to BSB Premium Content.

This content is restricted to subscribers

We have a two part mini-series this week exploring an approach on how to boost T cells in cold tumours. There are a number of different ways to do this, including adding them ex vivo such as via CAR T cell therapies, although this technique has yet to yield durable benefit in solid tumours.

So how else can it be done?

We’ve discussed immune agonists, oncolytic viruses and cancer vaccines in the past so now it’s time for something different…

In Part 1 of the series today, we explore the science behind the technology and some of the early clinical data that was recently presented at medical meetings.

In Part 2 tomorrow, we have not one but three, different voices exploring some researchers thoughts on where the approach might go.

It should make for interesting reading!

To learn more about these sentiments and insights, subscribers can log-in or you can purchase access to BSB Premium Content below…

This content is restricted to subscribers

ASCO 2014 Chicago Contemplation

Contemplation in Chicago ahead of #ASCO17

As part of our ongoing American Society of Clinical Research (#ASCO17) Preview series (we’re on number 5 already), we turn our attention to an upcoming area of cancer research that is expected to play an important role in future clinical trials and combination regimens because of the mechanism of action involved.

It may also turn out to be a very handy and important approach for turning cold into hot tumours.

To learn more, subscribers can login to read our latest insights and analysis

This content is restricted to subscribers

Free Email Updates
Subscribe to new post alerts, offers, and additional content!
We respect your privacy and do not sell emails. Unsubscribe at any time.
error: Content is protected !!