Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘T cell engagers’

Here we are with Part 2 of our latest mini-series on novel ways to jumpstart the immune system so that subsequent therapy can be more effective, leading to improved outcomes.

In Part 1, we looked at the preclinical and scientific evidence regarding a novel approach to modulate a cold or non-inflamed tumour type, thereby turning the phenotype into a hotter or inflamed one.

In principle, this concept sounds quite simple in theory, but in practice it’s actually much more technically challenging to do than many realise, especially when we consider not just the design of the antibody itself and perhaps even efficacy, but also the convenience of administration and tolerability, both as monotherapy and also in combination with other therapies.

What’s up on deck today is not one, but three interviews, offering readers a candid look through the keyhole at varied insights from different perspectives around a central R&D topic, namely…

What do you do when you have a new compound in clinical development and wish to explore how to integrate it – do you use it with an existing framework or try something new and different? What about other compounds that might be competing with it internally?

It’s a question every single oncology company faces when a new molecule moves out of preclinical development into phase 1 trials. What next?

To learn more insights on this intriguing topic, subscribers can log-in or you can purchase access to BSB Premium Content.

We have a two part mini-series this week exploring an approach on how to boost T cells in cold tumours. There are a number of different ways to do this, including adding them ex vivo such as via CAR T cell therapies, although this technique has yet to yield durable benefit in solid tumours.

So how else can it be done?

We’ve discussed immune agonists, oncolytic viruses and cancer vaccines in the past so now it’s time for something different…

In Part 1 of the series today, we explore the science behind the technology and some of the early clinical data that was recently presented at medical meetings.

In Part 2 tomorrow, we have not one but three, different voices exploring some researchers thoughts on where the approach might go.

It should make for interesting reading!

To learn more about these sentiments and insights, subscribers can log-in or you can purchase access to BSB Premium Content below…

ASCO 2014 Chicago Contemplation

Contemplation in Chicago ahead of #ASCO17

As part of our ongoing American Society of Clinical Research (#ASCO17) Preview series (we’re on number 5 already), we turn our attention to an upcoming area of cancer research that is expected to play an important role in future clinical trials and combination regimens because of the mechanism of action involved.

It may also turn out to be a very handy and important approach for turning cold into hot tumours.

To learn more, subscribers can login to read our latest insights and analysis

Washington DC Cherry Blossoms

Spring cherry blossoms

It’s twelve working days until the start of the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in New Orleans. This is a meeting we’re especially looking forward to this year, not only for the cool science on offer, but also the Louisiana Coastal Cuisine!

Next year, AACR 2017 returns to Washington DC, at what hopefully will be a perfect time for cherry blossoms along the Tidal Basin.

In this post, I’ve taken a closer look at one cancer immunotherapy approach with new data at AACR – bispecific T cell engagers.  Amgen’s blinatumomab (Blincyto) is interesting because it was the first T cell engager antibody to be approved by the FDA for the treatment of Philadelphia-negative ALL and refractory B-cell precursor ALL, thereby offering proof of concept that such an approach could be safe and effective. There are, however, some challenges associated with it (which you’ll read about).

Can we improve on blinatumomab?

This post will address the question in three parts:

  • A look at what we know about blinatumomab to date
  • Where the competitive landscape is evolving with potential solutions
  • An interview with a scientist actively working in this field for their perspective.

For those attending AACR, I’ve put in links to some of the sessions and presentations to watch out for if you have an interest in bispecifics (there are a surprising number of them in R&D) – we’ll be writing more about some of the noteworthy data after it has been presented.

Subscribers can login below or you can purchase access to Day 1 of our Road to AACR mini series…..

error: Content is protected !!