Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘UCL’

London – last week a half day event at The Francis Crick Institute looked at three UK cell therapy companies that have been spun out of academic research from partner institutions, UCL and King’s College London.

Medicine at Crick Welcome

Professor Julian Downward welcomes everyone to The Crick

We heard from the CEOs of Achilles Therapeutics, GammaDelta Therapeutics and Autolus Therapeutics on how they are translating science into new adoptive cellular therapies.

There were also presentations from leading scientists whose research they are commercializing.

All three companies were founded in 2016, so the event was a fascinating snapshot as to where are they now, roughly 3 years on, what have they achieved and where are they going.

They vary in terms of their vision, innovation and their adoptive cellular therapy approach.

Autolus are developing autologous CAR-T cell therapies, GammaDelta Therapeutics are focusing on allogeneic Vδ1 gamma delta (ϒδ) T cells, while Achilles Therapeutics are targeting patient-derived clonal neoantigens.

If you couldn’t make this Medicine at the Crick event, what were some of the take home messages, and how do we think these companies compare to some of their competitors?

Subscribers can log-in to read more or you can purchase access to BSB Premium Content.

This content is restricted to subscribers

It’s that time of the month where the BSB readers get their chance to put us on the hot spot!

SITC 2015 Land GrabHere, we take a look at reader questions that have been submitted and argue the toss – is there evidence preclinically or clinically that is useful or instructive?

We can’t promise to answer every question, sometimes there simply isn’t any data to help either way.

This week, the topic is CAR T cell therapies, a subject that seems to be very high on many people’s minds and many of you had similar questions, so here goes…  

Subscribers can log in to learn more insights…

This content is restricted to subscribers

Everybody who has sat too long in the sun knows how painful sunburn can be, and how ineffective current treatments such as topical creams can be.

Research by John Dawes and colleagues at King’s College London & University College London has shed new light on how sunburn causes pain.

They investigated the inflammatory response associated with ultraviolet B radiation of the skin and found that the chemokine CXCL5 (also known as epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating peptide-78) mediates UVB irradiation-induced pain in the skin of rats.

The results, published in Science Translational Medicine (STM), suggest that CXCL5 mediates UVB irradiation-induced pain and may be a target for the development of new analgesics or pain killers.

The elegant series of experiments done by Dawes and colleagues attempted to overcome one of the main challenges of pain research – the results from animal models don’t always predict pain relief in humans.

They designed custom-made Taqman array cards to determine the expression of inflammatory mediators in UVB treated rat and human skin, and found chemokine CXCL5 expression to be up-regulated in both rat and humans 40 hours after UVB treatment.

They then tested the hypothesis that CXCL5 was the cause of the pain, and that neutralization of this reduced mechanical hypersensitivity in rats and decreased the number of infiltrating cells. The STM paper is well worth reading for the series of experiments they performed.

Inflammation and inflammatory mediators are poorly understood in many diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA), so generating a better understanding of the underlying biology and mediators of inflammation is key to drug development.

It is too early to tell whether CXCL5 will turn out to be a druggable target, but the work by Dawes and colleagues is a good example of translational medical research worth exploring further.

ResearchBlogging.orgDawes, J., Calvo, M., Perkins, J., Paterson, K., Kiesewetter, H., Hobbs, C., Kaan, T., Orengo, C., Bennett, D., & McMahon, S. (2011). CXCL5 Mediates UVB Irradiation-Induced Pain Science Translational Medicine, 3 (90), 90-90 DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3002193

Free Email Updates
Subscribe to new post alerts, offers, and additional content!
We respect your privacy and do not sell emails. Unsubscribe at any time.
error: Content is protected !!