Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘CRISPR’

This is the penultimate post in our mini-series looking at the potential of immunometabolism for cancer new product development. The initial plans for six posts ended up being revised with a seventh and final article based on an additional thought leader interview.

What’s the immunometabolism prize?

Like a series of postcards from our travels, the aim was to offer a flavor of different approaches in the field, some of which are already being translated and evaluated by biotech companies in clinical trials.

Along the way, like conversations on a journey, we spoke to several scientists working at the forefront of this research. As regular readers know we don’t just interview the ‘great and good’ – the established PI’s but in this series – we also spoke to some emerging up and coming researchers too. Each offered a unique personal perspective on different aspects of metabolism and its potential role in cancer research.

In today’s post, we share an interview with a young researcher working on a novel and intriguing approach, which could improve adoptive cell therapy.

We expect to hear a lot more about many of the immunometabolic strategies we’ve highlighted over the course of coming months, so this is a theme we will return to as new data emerges.

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Sunrise over Sitges

Sitges – One of the noticeable things about Sitges, a former fishing village south of Barcelona, is the quality of the light. We could imagine it, like St Ives in Cornwall, as being home to artists in times past.

The sunrises and sunsets have been particularly impressive. When it comes to oncology new product development, we’re all chasing the light and the potential of a cure. That’s the promise of cancer immunotherapy.

Here at the 2nd European CAR T cell meeting, jointly organized by EHA and EBMT, we’ve heard about where we’re at with current cell therapies, some of the many challenges that have yet to be overcome and we’ve been offered insights into where some in the field are going.

2020 will be a landmark year for CAR T cell therapy with new regulatory approvals on the horizon, particularly in myeloma, but the journey to make these therapies effective in solid tumours is one where we still need to chase the light.

In this post you can read our notes and commentary on day 2 in Sitges and what caught our attention at the meeting.

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Unlike last year, rain in San Francisco wasn’t a feature in 2019

If there’s anyone who hasn’t got fed up looking for somewhere to sit and chat or have a meeting in San Francisco at the 2019 JP Morgan Healthcare conference this week, then don’t be surprised…

With meeting space continually at a premium and many attendees unwilling to pay exhorbitant table rental prices, you now see people resorting to the lobby steps at the Sir Francis Drake, while the ladies have the advantage over the gents of access to the powder room in the Westin (with plugs!)

There’s also a movement from the chic to the shabby:

JPM is as much about informal meetings, pitches and confabs about new ideas, as it is about the actual CEO presentations, and so this situation is likely to continue in future years.

Meanwhile, we continue to dive in with our latest daily blog and put a bunch of companies through their paces.  If day 1 is all about the big pharmas, by day 3 the focus is much more on up and coming or mid sized biotechs…

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Salt Lake City, Utah – The CAR T cell therapy niche has certainly provided plenty of controversy, highlights and lowlights over the last decade or so, although much of the mainstream attention has really only surfaced in the last couple of years.

Gone skiing?

For those interested in this space, there is a short synopsis of the BMT Tandem 2018 plenary session that took place this weekend and simultaneously published in the ASBMT journal (See: Perales et al., 2018):

“Building a Safer and Faster CAR: Seatbelts, Airbags, and CRISPR” 

While no one doubts that we have a need for safer CARs to reduce or ameliorate severe toxicities (the debate here is what are the best ways to achieve that in the clinic), it remains unclear whether a fast or slow approach is the optimal way forward in terms of efficacy.

In this post, we take a look at new clinical and scientific findings that may pave the way forward for the future in the CAR T cell space through the lens of several different academic institutions…

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Paris – amazingly it’s now 3 years since we interviewed Cellectis (NASDAQ: $CLLS) CEO André Choulika and CSO Philippe Duchateau (See post: Can Cellectis revolutionise CAR T cell therapy):

Cellectis CSO CEO

Cellectis Senior Management – Drs Duchateau and Choulika

Since then, we’ve followed the company over time, including an interview with one of their leading scientists, Dr Julianne Smith at ASH 2014, followed by the initial results of their first allogeneic CAR T cell therapy UCART19 presented at #ASH15 by Professor Qasim.

It’s hard to believe 3 years have gone by so quickly! As regular readers know what we often do on BSB is follow stories longitudinally, so while in Paris for an Immuno-Oncology Summit we thought it a rather timely opportunity to revisit Cellectis and take stock of where they’re at and ask what the future may hold for them?

With the recent news that Gilead have acquired Kite Pharma, there’s going to be a lot of interest in what companies such as Cellectis are doing to bring allogeneic “off the shelf” CAR T cell therapy to market.

This is the penultimate post in our summer mini-series on gene editing and allogeneic CAR T cell therapy and features a candid interview with Dr Philippe Duchateau, Chief Scientific Officer, at Paris based Cellectis.

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It’s Wednesday at the 2017 JP Morgan Healthcare Conference and the last full day of the meeting. 

SF Streetcar at Pine StIt’s also our last day for a rolling blog; we hope you’ve enjoyed our coverage and commentary this year.

If you want to catch up on what we’ve written about, do check out our posts form Day 1 (Link) and Day 2 of JPM17 (Link).

Yesterday also included some thoughts on the latest Merck pembrolizumab filing announcement in 1L NSCLC, which has certainly had a dramatic impact on the market, even for big pharma (MRK +$4.9B, BMY -$3.3B).

Companies we’ve covered so far include: Celgene, Incyte, Seattle Genetics, Clovis, Puma, BMS, Five Prime, Nektar, Juno and others.

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