Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Galunisertib’

Remember the good old days at ESMO17 in Madrid? Sadly there’s no face to face networking at this year’s ESMO20 virtual meeting!

In this third ESMO 2020 Preview the focus is on early stage immunotherapies – we’ll cover targeted therapies in a separate review article.

As new regimens evolve involving multiple immune targets, this complexity brings with it a greater need to understand cell-cell interactions – not just immune cell relationships, but also oncogenic, metabolic, and even epigenetic ones. How do they all fit together and what happens when we interfere with those relationships therapeutically?

Often the simple answer is we don’t know until we head into the clinic, I’m afraid.

Beyond the obvious phase 3 IO readouts in the various Presidential symposia and Proffered oral sessions there are quite a few emerging ideas – old ones with a twist as well as entirely new ones – which we can consider and discuss.

Here, we highlight five key IO areas related to cancer immunotherapy and explore the various concepts as preparation for the upcoming meeting…

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One of our popular series from conferences is Gems from the Poster Halls, where we take a look at some of the studies or research data that caught our attention and explain how they may have future significance. In the past, posters have lead to phase 2 or 3 trial designs and subsequent approval. Others have sadly missed signals in small studies that could have prevented an expensive phase 3 faiure. Hence, it is often important to pay attention to posters.

esmo16-poster-hall

The ESMO16 Poster Hall Maze

Posters can also give early warning for what’s developing in pipelines. The BTK inhibitor, ibrutinib, was originally codenamed CRA–032765 (at Celera) and later PCI–32765 (at Pharmacyclics), for example, while the PI3K-delta inhibitor, idelalisib started life as CAL–101 (at Calistoga). We previously followed the progress of these compounds while they were in preclinical and phase 1 and documented progress long before they became active drugs in a race to market in CLL.

My favourite codename is always going to be STI–571 (imatinib). We would start planning ASCO and ASH activities every January and September, so companies should be well in hand in their preparations for ASH and SABCS by now. There’s a tremendous amount of work involved behind the scenes in order to have a great event, and I’m not talking about the fripperies like exhibits and light boxes here.

Last year at ECCO, StemCentRx burst on the scene and were subsequently acquired at a significant premium by AbbVie, taking quite a few people by surprise.

So what can we learn about the data from ESMO this year? What new trends are emerging this time around?

Here, we take a fresh look at FOUR interesting new developments from small and large pharma/biotech companies alike in Part 2 of the Gems series. In the first one [Link], we interviewed an expert and discussed their approach to biomarkers in early small studies to help them better design larger follow-on trials more effectively.

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