Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘MedImmune’

Over the years we’ve interviewed folks from numerous pharma and biotech companies here on BSB, including those with targeted therapies (small and large), as well as immunotherapies.

Some companies have small pipelines and may be forced by circumstances to explore what they have or seek collaborations with bigger partners.

For big pharmas with large pockets plus broad and deeper pipelines, the challenge is quite different – how do you prioritise potential combinations and tumour targets given it is impossible to evaluate them all in the clinic? How do you create differential advantage and value when you’re relatively later to market compared to your competitors?

In the BSB spotlight this week we have two researchers in clinical development and R&D from the same company, who happen to have both elements in their pipeline in areas of high competition.

Part one of our latest mini-series explores the IO side of the business as we look ‘Through the Keyhole’ at what’s going on in terms of biomarkers, monotherapy trials, combination studies (both IO-IO and IO-targeted) and what to expect in the near-term future later this year. It’s a wide ranging, candid, and fascinating discussion that highlights a lot of potential in terms of what could happen with a large pipeline.

In all, it makes for rather interesting reading and certainly changed how I perceived the company’s efforts in the IO sphere (for the better, I might add).  So what’s fascinating about their approach and what can we learn from their progress to date?

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Macarons in shop windowWe’re all familiar by now with the idea of checkpoints that can be inhibitory (release the brake) or stimulatory (put the foot on the gas) on the immune system.

There are multiple checkpoint modulators in development, it’s becoming a bit like buying a macaron – which flavour do you want?

As the late Holbrook Kohrt said on the Novel Targets Podcast last year:

There are two types of checkpoint inhibitors, one checkpoint inhibitor are these series of markers that each of them when you target them, they will slow down the function of that cell. Now that’s a good thing if that cell is a suppressor cell, such as a regulatory T cell. Anti-CTLA-4, ipilimumab, the first approved immunotherapeutic monoclonal antibody targets these regulatory T cells. Essentially is this concept as you said of taking off the brake .

Now if you want to press on the gas pedal, you want to find a target that is essentially that actually increases the function of a cell you want to make work better…….

…. these ideas of the different checkpoint inhibitors, essentially we should really call them, checkpoint modulation, because the checkpoints can either be gas pedals or they can be brakes.

And ultimately, it’s a question about how do you combine them in a rational way so that way you’re not either pushing the car too hard or taking the brake off at a time when the car is rolling in the wrong direction.

So essentially, you need to do checkpoint modulation in a setting where you still have the steering wheel on your car to ensure it’s directed against the right cells, otherwise you’re going to get significant toxicity.”

Which is a good introduction to Day 5 of our Road to AACR 2016 mini-series.

Over the course of 12 days in the run up to the 2016 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), we’re taking a look at some of the areas we expect to hear more about in New Orleans.

In today’s post, which continues our look at some of novel cancer immunotherapy targets, we’re look at the modulation of GITR (glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor related gene) and companies that are targeting this.

GITR was named as the 12th most promising cancer immunotherapy target by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) back in 2006.  Interestingly, high GITR expression can be found on both T cells and NK cells.

There are now several agonist antibodies in development and entering the clinic that seek to activate GITR, and new data is expected at AACR 2016.

What GITR pathway data is worth looking out for at AACR 2016?

If you want to know more about why GITR matters, and where it fits into the cancer immunotherapy landscape then do read more. 

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There can be no doubt that immuno-oncology is a hot topic in cancer research of late with checkpoint inhibitors, immune agonists, immunocytokines, CAR T cells, TILs, TCRs, not forgetting innate immunotherapies.  We’ve written extensively about many of these topics, but what about the companies behind them and their strategies?

One thing subscribers tell us they love reading about here on BSB is not only fireside chats with thought leaders, but also interviews behind the scenes with company personnel, be scientists, clinicians or CSOs.

Recently, we’ve posted some interviews with Roche and Genentech scientists/physicians about their IO platform that were well received. Today, it’s the turn of AstraZeneca and MedImmune, who are also developing checkpoint inhibitors and immune agonists against various cancers.

With the anti-PD1 antibodies i.e. Merck’s pembrlizumab (Keytruda) and BMS’s nivolumab (Opdivo) already approved by the FDA, and Roche/Genentech’s atezolizmuab well on the way to filing in advanced urothelial bladder cancer with the announcement this week that the IMvigor 210 trial in relapsed/refractory disease met its primary endpoint, the big question now remains is what’s happening with the fourth element of the quartet? How well is progress coming along there and what is the main focus we can expect in the near future?

Cambridge PuntingLike most Brits, when AstraZeneca noted back in 2013 that they expect to establish their global R&D hub in Cambridge, I assumed they meant in the Golden Triangle and not Massachusetts. This is a burgeoning area for European biotech research, which is somewhat ironic after the KuDos scientists working on olaparib (Lynparza) moved to Alderley Park in Cheshire with the acquisition and will likely face moving back again!

At ASCO, we had the pleasure of a chat with Dr Rob Iannone, the head of the AstraZeneca Immuno-oncology development program.  The company also published a number of interesting abstracts and posters that were on show in Chicago, as well as a burgeoning pipeline in this area beyond their lead compounds, the anti-PDL1 inhibitor, durvalumab (MEDI4736) and tremelimumab (anti-CTLA4).

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With the sheer breadth and depth of immuno-oncology data being presented at even the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), several readers were prompted to write in and ask:

“Is this the end of the road for TKI therapies? Should we even bother to continue working on these agents?”

Good question.

There was actually quite a bit of interesting data on regular novel targeted therapy to discuss, although I do concede that much of the mass media news focusing on the immuno-oncology tsunami in Philadelphia effectively drowned out targeted therapies and the results coming out in that space.

Reading Market Philly Chocolate TowerTo maintain the balance between novel targeted agents and immunotherapy, here’s a review of some of the interesting new developments that I came across at AACR, from both the poster halls, as well as some of the thought leaders in this space.

When you stack up the emerging evidence in several tumour subsets, there are quite a few tasty morsels that are worthy of further discussion!

I’d like to take this opportunity to extend a warm welcome to all the new subscribers who took advantage of the AACR Special Offer to continue their education and learning about the exciting new developments in cancer research.  Thank you for joining our conference coverage service, we really appreciate it.

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