Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Cancer Immunotherapy’

Recently there has been a glut of encouraging new research published on the topic of breast cancer that is well worth perusing as a group, since new combination studies may emerge from these kind of data.

In this month’s Journal Club edition, we explore five such articles plus some related research in support of the main themes.

To learn more insights on this intriguing topic, subscribers can log-in or you can purchase access to BSB Premium Content.

It’s that time of the year again – time to highlight key events and talks at the upcoming European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) meeting held in Madrid next month.

Over the next two days, we’re going to take a look at five key IO trials (today) and five targeted therapy studies (tomorrow) that are being presented at ESMO.

In short, what should readers know about these oral presentations for greater context, why are they important, and what should you be looking for?

We will cover the hidden gems from the poster halls to watch out for in a separate future post.

To learn more about our latest insights, subscribers can log-in or you can purchase access to BSB Premium Content.

One of the intriguing themes that emerged recently at ASCO from several cancer immunotherapy trials centred around whether any elicited immune responses actually correlated with outcomes and if so, why and how?

Gems from the ASCO17 poster hall

It sounds easy in practice, yet in reality the topic has been quite a controversial one that has been hotly debated for a while.

With a wealth of new cancer immunotherapy trials now undwerway and initial results trickling out, how do we start to make sense of the information and what do we learn that might be useful going forward for future trials and the field as a whole?

With the help of a renowned cancer immunologist, we explored this concept in more detail to determine what can be gleaned from the data available.

Today, we look at part one of our latest mini-series, with the second part to follow later this week.

Subscribers can log-in to read our latest insights or you can purchase access to BSB Premium Content.

In our latest thought leader interview we explore the intersection between epigenetic therapy and immunotherapy.

Gems from the ASCO17 poster hall

Much of the IO focus to date has been on monotherapies rather than combos, although that situation is slowly changing.

What we can also expect to see are the emergence of regimens, long the bedrock of traditional cancer therapy approaches.

As we learn how to bucket more discrete populations based on the underlying biology of the tumour microenvironment, so we will see a more IFTTT (If this then that) approach evolve in order to fix or improve a situation before or after attempting the core therapy. It might require a focus on changing the immunosuppressive or inhibitory factors, for example, or addressing factors that induce primary resistance upfront. The possibilities are endless.

Obviously, there are a number of ways to do this from chemotherapy and radiotherapy to epigenetic agents to targeted therapies – these traditional treatments are not going to go away, but I can see a future where we see more integration based on a patient’s underlying immune status. It won’t be the zero sum game many analysts seem to think it might be.

In the past, we have covered chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapies and looked at how they might be employed with immunotherapies in various guises. In this latest thought leader interview, we look at a different approach, epigenetic therapy and other novel immunotherapies.

Here, we combine two popular types of posts – Gems from the Poster Halls with an Expert Interview  – for detailed look at one particular area of research that is beginning to look quite intriguing.

To learn more insights on this intriguing topic, subscribers can log-in or you can purchase access to BSB Premium Content. 

One of my favourite pastimes at cancer conferences is discussions with up and coming young researchers about their current experiments and what they learn from them.

The poster hall rugby scrum at #ASCO17

In the spotlight today is one of the gems from the poster halls at ASCO this month…

Here we explore how liver mets, which is a common site of metastases, can influence the response of cancer immunotherapy.

The findings from this research highlight some intriguing biology as well as offer some hints about where to go next.

Subscribers can log-in or you can purchase access to BSB Premium Content. 

Sarcomas are a heterogeneous type of cancer that develop from certain tissues like bone or soft tissues such fat, muscle, nerves, fibrous tissues, blood vessels, or deep skin tissues.

Over the last two years, much has happened in this space so it’s an excellent time to revisit the niche and learn more about what experts think of the latest data that is emerging here.

We put a sarcoma expert in the spotlight and learned what their perspectives are on some of the emerging data in this niche as well as which ones offer hints of promise.

To learn more about the insights in STS, subscribers can log-in or you can purchase access to BSB Premium Content. 

At the AACR 2017 annual meeting, there was a surprising amount of early clinical data on offer, particularly in the field of cancer immunotherapy.

A shortage of reliable preclinical models that predict human response to cancer immunotherapy has led to a mad rush to the clinic to do trials in man – thee are now over 800 combination trials – if anyone wants to try and follow them all!

If you missed it do listen to the Of Mice and Men” episode of the Novel Targets Podcast recorded at AACR 2016 that features experts such as Dr Bernard Fox (@BernardAFox) and Professor Cornelius “Kees” Melief (Leiden) who discuss the challenges of mouse models.

Several thought leaders at this year’s AACR annual meting described it as “mini ASCO” given the focus on clinical data, with several plenary sessions devoted to the results of early trials.

Dr Julie Brahmer at AACR17 in Washington DC

At AACR17, Dr Julie Brahmer, a leading lung cancer expert and an Associate Professor of Oncology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Kimmel Institute presented long-term survival data for nivolumab in second-line non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

The 5-year survival rate of 16% with a single agent checkpoint inhibitor, while better than historical data with chemotherapy (~4%), is far from being a home-run, illustrating what a dismal disease this is to treat.

One of the challenges that we are starting to see with checkpoint inhibitor cancer immunotherapy is immune escape or acquired resistance in some patients. They may have an objective or partial response, and then relapse and progress (acquired resistance), or they may not respond at all (primary resistance).

From our experience with targeted therapies, it should perhaps come as no surprise that cancers may evolve, adapt and seek to evade immune detection. There are also many inhibitory factors in the tumour microenvironment to overcome in order to enable an immune response.

At AACR17, Dr Brahmer kindly spoke to BSB about what researchers at Johns Hopkins have learnt about checkpoint inhibitor resistance in lung cancer so far. Her insights are both insightful and very useful when we consider what to watch out for at the forthcoming ASCO meeting.

This post is part of our on-going series of expert interviews from AACR17.

In the additional commentary, now that the ASCO17 abstract titles are publicly available, we’ve also highlighted a few that caught our attention.  This is the first in our series of previews of ASCO17. We’ll be rolling out more hybrid posts as we segue our coverage from AACR17 to ASCO17.

Subscribers can login to read more

Washington DC – this is our final daily post from the 2017 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

Starting on Monday we’ll be writing up expert interviews and providing commentary and analysis around some of the sessions we went to and the data we heard.

Tuesday at AACR17 was a day when the Corvus Pharmaceuticals stock dropped 50% following presentation of preliminary clinical data for their A2A receptor antagonist CPI-444.

It’s hard not to be disappointed when you see the waterfall plots skewed to the left and above the X axis, but we really don’t have enough data yet to determine whether CPI-444 on it’s own or in combination with atezolizumab may offer benefit to some cancer patients and if so, which ones.

The company have expanded the renal (RCC) and lung cohorts (NSCLC) in their initial trial, and they’ve told us to expect more data at ASCO17 in a few weeks time. Small cap biotech stocks can be a roller coaster when it comes to data presentations at major medical/scientific meetings.

What else caught our attention in the sessions we attended on Tuesday at #AACR17?

Subscribers can login to read more

One of the frequently cited conceptual frameworks in Cancer Immunotherapy is the Cancer Immunity Cycle developed by Drs Dan Chen and Ira Mellman from Genentech.

Ira Mellman Dan Chen Authors of Cancer Immunity Cycle

Ira Mellman and Dan Chen

As we heard Dan and Ira tell us on the Novel Targets Podcast recorded last year at #AACR16, the cancer immunity cycle doesn’t include all the elements that we now know impact the immune system and whether someone will have an immune response. The microbiome is one example that readily comes to mind.

To address this, Chen and Mellman have now published the next installment in the series in Nature:

“Elements of Cancer Immunity and the cancer-immune setpoint.”

The review paper published last month incorporates the latest research into a different framework that looks at the factors that influence what they call the ‘cancer-immune setpoint.’

Anyone involved with cancer immunotherapy knows how fast moving and dynamic the field is, something they draw attention to:

“The pace of cancer immunotherapy clinical studies is such that they have outstripped our progress in understanding the underlying science. However, this situation has created the opportunity to combine emerging scientific and clinical insights in a synergistic fashion that… will also provide guidance for the identification of new targets… and the crafting of a framework for making decisions on a personalized basis.”

Conceptual frameworks such as those proposed by Chen and Mellman will be of increasing importance as we try to make sense of the tsunami of cancer immunotherapy clinical trial data, including combinations, that is coming our way over the next 18 months.

During my recent visit to San Francisco for ASCO GI, I had the great pleasure to catch up with Daniel S. Chen, MD PhD, (Global Head of Cancer Immunotherapy Development, Genentech/Roche) and talk about his latest thoughts on how we should think about cancer immunotherapy.

In writing these review papers he told me:

“We look at this as an opportunity to really think about the field, and try to conceptualize what is happening.”

We also discussed their collaboration with Kite Pharma, something of relevance to conferences this week as we head off to BMT Tandem and the ASCO-SITC meeting.

Subscribers can login to read the latest expert interview and the latest article in our Journal Club series…

Copenhagen – Day 3, Sunday at #ESMO16 was a day to remember on many levels. From being carried forward by a rush of people as a massive crowd was finally let into the Presidential Symposium…

Large crowd of delegates wait patiently to enter ESMO16 Presidential Symposium

Large crowd of delegates wait patiently to enter ESMO16 Presidential Symposium

…to hearing an outstanding discussion of data by one of Europe’s leading lung cancer experts, Professor Jean-Charles Soria (@jsoriamd). He was insightful, engaging, as well as funny in places and was a hard act to follow…

Prof. Soria discussing KEYNOTE-024 data at ESMO 2016

Prof. Soria discussing KEYNOTE-024 data at ESMO 2016

The end result was a day to remember, most significantly it was one where we heard data that will change the standard of care in front-line non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with the expected approval of pembrolizumab (Keytruda) for patients whose tumors have a high expression of PD-L1 (50% or more).

We’re continuing our daily digest of highlights from sessions we attended at the 2016 European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress here in Denmark.

nyhavn-denmark

The sun has not shone much here in Denmark during the Congress, the above photo of Nyhavn was taken just before the meeting started, but the data at ESMO16 has shone brightly with two more publications online in The New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with their presentation in Sunday’s Presidential Symposium:

Pembrolizumab versus Chemotherapy for PD-L1–Positive Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NEJM link)

Nivolumab for Recurrent Squamous-Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck (NEJM link).

This mini-series of daily digests over the 4 days of the Congress is intended to give subscribers a finger on the pulse on some of the buzz and conversation…. and occasionally an alternative perspective. We’ll be writing more detailed posts as part of a post-conference series.

In this post, @MaverickNY offers her topline impressions of the lung cancer data presented in the Presidential Symposium, how this will change how some patients are treated, and the resulting impact on the lung cancer landscape. Cancer Immunotherapy continues to drive changes in clinical practice, and is doing so at a very remarkable pace.

Subscribers can login to read more or you can purchase access…

error: Content is protected !!