Biotech Strategy Blog

Commentary on Science, Innovation & New Products with a focus on Oncology, Hematology & Cancer Immunotherapy

Posts tagged ‘Pancreatic Cancer’

MD Anderson Cancer Center

Houston, Texas – Advanced pancreatic cancer is a very tough disease to treat, so it is not surprising that by 2030 it will be the No. 2 cancer killer in the United States, according to one of the speakers at the recent 1st Annual Symposium on Pancreatic Cancer held at the MD Anderson Cancer Center earlier this week.

There’s also high unmet medical need for new effective therapies for pancreatic cancer, which is why events that promote collaboration and cross-fertilization among leading experts are important.

I found out about the event from Twitter thanks to tweets by Dr Anirban Maitra (@aiims1742) who shares a lot of information. Do follow him if you don’t already.

Thank you to everyone at MD Anderson for putting on a panel of excellent speakers. The meeting was well worth attending and I hope it will become an annual event.

In this post I’ve captured some of the key take-homes that I took from the symposium.

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MD Anderson, Houston

Houston, Texas – At the First Annual Symposium on Pancreatic Cancer organized by Ronald DePinho MD and colleagues at the MD Anderson Cancer Center on Monday, one of the presentations that caught my attention was on exosomes.

Raghu Kalluri MD PhD (@KalluriLab) gave an excellent talk on, Exploiting the Biology of Exosomes for Diagnosis and Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer.”

What were some of the key take homes from his presentation?

He kindly spoke to BSB in Houston and talked about the direction he is going in this rapidly evolving field of research.

Here’s a short snippet from the interview where he talks about one aspect of this approach and how it might be useful (the others are covered in more detail below):

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At the recent ASCO 2018 Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium (GI18), Steven. D Leach MD (Dartmouth) gave an excellent Keynote Lecture on “Mapping the Immune Landscape in Pancreatic Cancer.”

Pancreatic cancer has very poor outcomes, with a one-year relative survival rate (across all stages of the disease of 20%) and five-survival rate of 7% according to the American Cancer Society.  In addition, stage IV exocrine pancreatic cancer has a 5 year survival of about 1%, which is utterly dismal to say the least.

When it comes to cancer immunotherapy, so far we’ve not seen the success in pancreatic cancer that we’ve seen in other tumours, there are no FDA approved cancer immunotherapies for this disease.

Which raises a critical question of what is happening in the immune landscape of pancreatic cancer patients, and how will cancer immunotherapy be effective?

In this post, we discuss some of the key points that Dr Leach made in excellent presentation and look at some new developments on the horizon in PDAC.

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San Francisco

The first cancer conference of 2018 is now upon us and after enjoying last year’s event in San Francisco, I wanted to take some time to explore some key abstracts of interest at the ASCO GI meeting, which begins tomorrow.

This conference covers various updates on new developments in oesophageal, gastric, colon, pancreatic and colorectal cancers.

Are there any trials or new developments to get excited about at this year’s GI18 meeting?

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Sometimes initial phase 1/1b readouts at cancer conferences produce quite different reactions from a live and remote audience while at other meetings, the Developmental Therapeutics talks produce little or no interest at all. It’s often hard to guage which way they will go.

At SITC this weekend, several talks generated some contentious, and at times quite heated, debate and intense interest.

One of these was an oral presentation by Dr Zev Wainberg on the first-in-man data with the anti-CSF1R and anti-PD1 inhibitors, cabiralizumab and nivolumab, from Five Prime and BMS respectively, in an advanced pancreatic cohort.

Dr Zev Wainberg at SITC 2017

There was a surprising amount of confusion surrounding the initial results and other issues last week, with Five Prime’s stock dropping before we’d even got to Dr Wainberg’s talk.

What became increasingly obvious over the weekend was a clear difference in investors perceptions versus what the scientific community actually thought.

Here we take a look at the data and explain what to watch out for and why…

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National Harbor, MD – Day 2 of #SITC17 brought some interesting highlights on a number of fronts, not all of which may be apparent at present, but there are a few readouts that will have a broader impact going forward.

SITC 2017 Stars?

As we move into an era where we see more combinations evolve in immuno-onology, things are likely to get more confusing rather than less so and it could well be another 3-5 years before things truly settle down and more concrete trends emerge.

Here, we reviewed 10 different areas of interest with a strong clinical relevance and explored the topics further.

Please note that some of these will also have follow-on posts with thought leader interviews and related poster reviews.

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With the annual meeting of Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) fast approaching this week, it’s time for a look at some of the final highlights to watch out for.

National Harbor from Gaylord HotelIn this latest conference preview, we have chosen a dozen key topics of interest that readers may find worth checking out plus an honourable mention for early compounds in development that we may well hear more about going forward.

Some of the early warning signs were offered up in the earlier Previews and with the abstracts now available, things are getting very interesting indeed…

How are things panning out so far with the abstract drop and are the new products in development living up to the hype and expectations?

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Before we move on to the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) meeting later this week, it’s time to wrap up the exciting AACR-NCI-EORTC molecular targets conference, which along with the CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR international cancer immunotherapy conference in Mainz, have been my two favourite oncology meetings of the year so far.

Who would have predicted that back in January?

A scoot around the narrow #Targets17 poster hall…

It would be hard not to close out coverage without a popular Gems from the Poster Halls post.

Typically, we have focused this theme from cancer conferences around the following:

  • A new target
  • An interesting molecule
  • Intriguing basic or translational science of note
  • A particular tumour type
  • Insightful sentiments from thought leaders

In this latest version, we have examples of each.  We also have my favourite quote and discussion from the meeting, which perhaps not surprisingly, comes from a CAR T cell therapy discussion.

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Over the last four or five weeks we have seen some truly remarkable research published by numerous cancer researchers around the globe… which means that it’s time for another Journal Club review of key research to feature some cool science.

Here, we have selected half a dozen key papers of interest in both solid tumours and hematological malignancies that are well worth reading and digesting.  The impact from many of these may well lead to new molecules being explored.  We also include at least one review paper for BSB readers to peruse.

While much of the focus is inevitably on lung cancer and melanoma of late, we also highlight important research in pancreatic cancer, aggressive lymphomas and AML.

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Dr James Gulley is Chief of the Genito-Urinary malignancies branch and Director of the Medical Oncology service at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the National Institutes of Health. He’s a world-leading GU cancer expert and at the forefront of pioneering research to make cancer immunotherapy work in prostate cancer.

We last spoke to him at ASCO 2015 (See post: The future of prostate cancer immunotherapy). You can listen to excerpts from this interview on Episode 4 of the Novel Targets podcast (See: The non-inflamed tumour show).

Almost two years on, and new research by Dr Gulley and colleagues from the NCI shows that the STING pathway may have an important role to play in prostate cancer immunotherapy. Activation of this pathway through a novel mechanism could turn a cold non-inflamed tumor into a more inflamed or hotter one in men with advanced prostate cancer. How cool is that?!

At the 2017 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) that was recently held in Washington DC, Dr Gulley graciously spoke to BSB about some of the novel trials that are underway at the NCI, with the aim of making cancer immunotherapy work in men with advanced prostate cancer.

Dr Jim Gulley, NCI at AACR17

This is the seventh expert interviews in our series from AACR17 where we explore the conundrum:

How does Dr Gulley plan to light the immune camp fire in prostate cancer?

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